Prostate-specific antigen patterns in US and European populations

comparison of six diverse cohorts

Andrew J. Simpkin, Jenny L. Donovan, Kate Tilling, J. Athene Lane, Richard M. Martin, Peter C. Albertsen, Anna Bill-Axelson, H. Ballentine Carter, J. L.H.Ruud Bosch, Luigi Ferrucci, Freddie C. Hamdy, Lars Holmberg, E. Metter, David E. Neal, Christopher C. Parker, Chris Metcalfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether there are differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at diagnosis or changes in PSA levels between US and European populations of men with and without prostate cancer (PCa). Subjects and Methods: We analysed repeated measures of PSA from six clinically and geographically diverse cohorts of men: two cohorts with PSA-detected PCa, two cohorts with clinically detected PCa and two cohorts without PCa. Using multilevel models, average PSA at diagnosis and PSA change over time were compared among study populations. Results: The annual percentage PSA change of 4–5% was similar between men without cancer and men with PSA-detected cancer. PSA at diagnosis was 1.7 ng/mL lower in a US cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa (95% confidence interval 1.3–2.0 ng/mL), compared with a UK cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa, but there was no evidence of a different rate of PSA change between these populations. Conclusion: We found that PSA changes over time are similar in UK and US men diagnosed through PSA testing and even in men without PCa. Further development of PSA models to monitor men on active surveillance should be undertaken in order to take advantage of these similarities. We found no evidence that guidelines for using PSA to monitor men cannot be passed between US and European studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)911-918
Number of pages8
JournalBJU International
Volume118
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Prostate-Specific Antigen
Population
Prostatic Neoplasms
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Simpkin, A. J., Donovan, J. L., Tilling, K., Athene Lane, J., Martin, R. M., Albertsen, P. C., ... Metcalfe, C. (2016). Prostate-specific antigen patterns in US and European populations: comparison of six diverse cohorts. BJU International, 118(6), 911-918. https://doi.org/10.1111/bju.13422

Prostate-specific antigen patterns in US and European populations : comparison of six diverse cohorts. / Simpkin, Andrew J.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Tilling, Kate; Athene Lane, J.; Martin, Richard M.; Albertsen, Peter C.; Bill-Axelson, Anna; Ballentine Carter, H.; Bosch, J. L.H.Ruud; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Holmberg, Lars; Metter, E.; Neal, David E.; Parker, Christopher C.; Metcalfe, Chris.

In: BJU International, Vol. 118, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 911-918.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simpkin, AJ, Donovan, JL, Tilling, K, Athene Lane, J, Martin, RM, Albertsen, PC, Bill-Axelson, A, Ballentine Carter, H, Bosch, JLHR, Ferrucci, L, Hamdy, FC, Holmberg, L, Metter, E, Neal, DE, Parker, CC & Metcalfe, C 2016, 'Prostate-specific antigen patterns in US and European populations: comparison of six diverse cohorts', BJU International, vol. 118, no. 6, pp. 911-918. https://doi.org/10.1111/bju.13422
Simpkin AJ, Donovan JL, Tilling K, Athene Lane J, Martin RM, Albertsen PC et al. Prostate-specific antigen patterns in US and European populations: comparison of six diverse cohorts. BJU International. 2016 Dec 1;118(6):911-918. https://doi.org/10.1111/bju.13422
Simpkin, Andrew J. ; Donovan, Jenny L. ; Tilling, Kate ; Athene Lane, J. ; Martin, Richard M. ; Albertsen, Peter C. ; Bill-Axelson, Anna ; Ballentine Carter, H. ; Bosch, J. L.H.Ruud ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Hamdy, Freddie C. ; Holmberg, Lars ; Metter, E. ; Neal, David E. ; Parker, Christopher C. ; Metcalfe, Chris. / Prostate-specific antigen patterns in US and European populations : comparison of six diverse cohorts. In: BJU International. 2016 ; Vol. 118, No. 6. pp. 911-918.
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abstract = "Objective: To determine whether there are differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at diagnosis or changes in PSA levels between US and European populations of men with and without prostate cancer (PCa). Subjects and Methods: We analysed repeated measures of PSA from six clinically and geographically diverse cohorts of men: two cohorts with PSA-detected PCa, two cohorts with clinically detected PCa and two cohorts without PCa. Using multilevel models, average PSA at diagnosis and PSA change over time were compared among study populations. Results: The annual percentage PSA change of 4–5{\%} was similar between men without cancer and men with PSA-detected cancer. PSA at diagnosis was 1.7 ng/mL lower in a US cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa (95{\%} confidence interval 1.3–2.0 ng/mL), compared with a UK cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa, but there was no evidence of a different rate of PSA change between these populations. Conclusion: We found that PSA changes over time are similar in UK and US men diagnosed through PSA testing and even in men without PCa. Further development of PSA models to monitor men on active surveillance should be undertaken in order to take advantage of these similarities. We found no evidence that guidelines for using PSA to monitor men cannot be passed between US and European studies.",
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AU - Simpkin, Andrew J.

AU - Donovan, Jenny L.

AU - Tilling, Kate

AU - Athene Lane, J.

AU - Martin, Richard M.

AU - Albertsen, Peter C.

AU - Bill-Axelson, Anna

AU - Ballentine Carter, H.

AU - Bosch, J. L.H.Ruud

AU - Ferrucci, Luigi

AU - Hamdy, Freddie C.

AU - Holmberg, Lars

AU - Metter, E.

AU - Neal, David E.

AU - Parker, Christopher C.

AU - Metcalfe, Chris

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N2 - Objective: To determine whether there are differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at diagnosis or changes in PSA levels between US and European populations of men with and without prostate cancer (PCa). Subjects and Methods: We analysed repeated measures of PSA from six clinically and geographically diverse cohorts of men: two cohorts with PSA-detected PCa, two cohorts with clinically detected PCa and two cohorts without PCa. Using multilevel models, average PSA at diagnosis and PSA change over time were compared among study populations. Results: The annual percentage PSA change of 4–5% was similar between men without cancer and men with PSA-detected cancer. PSA at diagnosis was 1.7 ng/mL lower in a US cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa (95% confidence interval 1.3–2.0 ng/mL), compared with a UK cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa, but there was no evidence of a different rate of PSA change between these populations. Conclusion: We found that PSA changes over time are similar in UK and US men diagnosed through PSA testing and even in men without PCa. Further development of PSA models to monitor men on active surveillance should be undertaken in order to take advantage of these similarities. We found no evidence that guidelines for using PSA to monitor men cannot be passed between US and European studies.

AB - Objective: To determine whether there are differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at diagnosis or changes in PSA levels between US and European populations of men with and without prostate cancer (PCa). Subjects and Methods: We analysed repeated measures of PSA from six clinically and geographically diverse cohorts of men: two cohorts with PSA-detected PCa, two cohorts with clinically detected PCa and two cohorts without PCa. Using multilevel models, average PSA at diagnosis and PSA change over time were compared among study populations. Results: The annual percentage PSA change of 4–5% was similar between men without cancer and men with PSA-detected cancer. PSA at diagnosis was 1.7 ng/mL lower in a US cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa (95% confidence interval 1.3–2.0 ng/mL), compared with a UK cohort of men with PSA-detected PCa, but there was no evidence of a different rate of PSA change between these populations. Conclusion: We found that PSA changes over time are similar in UK and US men diagnosed through PSA testing and even in men without PCa. Further development of PSA models to monitor men on active surveillance should be undertaken in order to take advantage of these similarities. We found no evidence that guidelines for using PSA to monitor men cannot be passed between US and European studies.

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