Protective factors can mitigate behavior problems after prenatal cocaine and other drug exposures

Henrietta S. Bada, Carla M. Bann, Toni Whitaker, Charles R. Bauer, Seetha Shankaran, Linda LaGasse, Barry M. Lester, Jane Hammond, Rosemary Higgins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We determined the role of risk and protective factors on the trajectories of behavior problems associated with high prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE)/polydrug exposure. METHODS: The Maternal Lifestyle Study enrolled 1388 children with or without PCE, assessed through age 15 years. Because most women using cocaine during pregnancy also used other substances, we analyzed for the effects of 4 categories of prenatal drug exposure: high PCE/other drugs (OD), some PCE/OD, OD/no PCE, and no PCE/no OD. Risks and protective factors at individual, family, and community levels that may be associated with behavior outcomes were entered stepwise into latent growth curve models, then replaced by cumulative risk and protective indexes, and finally by a combination of levels of risk and protective indexes. Main outcome measures were the trajectories of externalizing, internalizing, total behavior, and attention problems scores from the Child Behavior Checklist (parent). RESULTS: A total of 1022 (73.6%) children had known outcomes. High PCE/OD significantly predicted externalizing, total, and attention problems when considering the balance between risk and protective indexes. Some PCE/OD predicted externalizing and attention problems. OD/no PCE also predicted behavior outcomes except for internalizing behavior. High level of protective factors was associated with declining trajectories of problem behavior scores over time, independent of drug exposure and risk index scores. CONCLUSIONS: High PCE/OD is a significant risk for behavior problems in adolescence; protective factors may attenuate its detrimental effects. Clinical practice and public health policies should consider enhancing protective factors while minimizing risks to improve outcomes of drug-exposed children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume130
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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Cocaine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Problem Behavior
Protective Factors
Child Behavior
Public Policy
Health Policy
Risk-Taking
Checklist
Life Style
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Protective factors can mitigate behavior problems after prenatal cocaine and other drug exposures. / Bada, Henrietta S.; Bann, Carla M.; Whitaker, Toni; Bauer, Charles R.; Shankaran, Seetha; LaGasse, Linda; Lester, Barry M.; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 130, No. 6, 01.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bada, HS, Bann, CM, Whitaker, T, Bauer, CR, Shankaran, S, LaGasse, L, Lester, BM, Hammond, J & Higgins, R 2012, 'Protective factors can mitigate behavior problems after prenatal cocaine and other drug exposures', Pediatrics, vol. 130, no. 6. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-3306
Bada, Henrietta S. ; Bann, Carla M. ; Whitaker, Toni ; Bauer, Charles R. ; Shankaran, Seetha ; LaGasse, Linda ; Lester, Barry M. ; Hammond, Jane ; Higgins, Rosemary. / Protective factors can mitigate behavior problems after prenatal cocaine and other drug exposures. In: Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 130, No. 6.
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