Proteomics and liver fibrosis

Identifying markers of fibrogenesis

Valeria Mas, Robert A. Fisher, Kellie J. Archer, Daniel Maluf

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic hepatic disease damages the liver and the resulting wound-healing process might lead to liver fibrosis and subsequent cirrhosis development. Fibrosis is the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the tissue as consequence of chronic liver damage. The fibrotic response triggers almost all of the complications of end-stage liver disease, including portal hypertension, ascites, encephalopathy, synthetic dysfunction and impaired metabolic capacity. Thus, efforts to understand and attenuate fibrosis have direct clinical implications. Reliable, accurate, disease-specific, noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis and fibrogenesis in order to prevent or minimize the impact of the chronic liver disease progression are a critical need. This review aims to provide an overview of the possibilities that proteome technology can offer to the knowledge, diagnosis and prognosis of liver fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-431
Number of pages11
JournalExpert Review of Proteomics
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Liver Cirrhosis
Liver
Proteomics
Fibrosis
Chronic Disease
End Stage Liver Disease
Brain Diseases
Portal Hypertension
Proteome
Ascites
Wound Healing
Extracellular Matrix
Disease Progression
Liver Diseases
Biomarkers
Technology
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Proteomics and liver fibrosis : Identifying markers of fibrogenesis. / Mas, Valeria; Fisher, Robert A.; Archer, Kellie J.; Maluf, Daniel.

In: Expert Review of Proteomics, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.08.2009, p. 421-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mas, Valeria ; Fisher, Robert A. ; Archer, Kellie J. ; Maluf, Daniel. / Proteomics and liver fibrosis : Identifying markers of fibrogenesis. In: Expert Review of Proteomics. 2009 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 421-431.
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