Proteomics of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are specialized, multifunctional cells in the retina that form a monolayer of cuboidal, polarized cells adjoining the photoreceptor cells. The RPE are a critical component of the blood-retinal barrier, and they play essential functional roles for maintenance of retinal homeostasis and for support and health of photoreceptors. Age-dependent, progressive dysfunction and death of RPE cells and the resultant loss of photoreceptors contribute significantly to the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other retinal degenerative diseases. Several different RPE cell culture models have been developed and utilized extensively as surrogates for cellular and molecular examinations of the RPE, and a large body of knowledge on RPE function in normal and pathological scenarios has been amassed in studies with cultured RPE. Proteomics has been an integral part of research efforts aimed to advance our understanding of RPE cell biology in health and disease. This review focuses on applications of proteomics to in vitro qualitative and quantitative investigation of human RPE cell culture models. The disease context discussed focuses on AMD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number22
JournalProteomes
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 27 2018

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Retinal Pigments
Retinal Pigment Epithelium
Proteome
Proteomics
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Macular Degeneration
Cell culture
Cell Culture Techniques
Health
Blood-Retinal Barrier
Cytology
Retinal Diseases
Photoreceptor Cells
Cell Biology
Retina
Monolayers
Homeostasis
Blood
Maintenance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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Proteomics of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. / Beranova, Sarka; Giorgianni, Francesco.

In: Proteomes, Vol. 6, No. 2, 22, 27.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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