Protocol for measurement of enamel loss from brushing with an anti-erosive toothpaste after an acidic episode

Mojdeh Dehghan, Jose Estevam Vieira Ozorio, Simon Chanin, Daranee Versluis, Antheunis Versluis, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Tooth erosion from an acidic insult may be exacerbated by toothbrushing. The purposes of this study were to develop an in vitro methodology to measure enamel loss after brushing immediately following an acidic episode and to investigate the effect of brushing with an anti-erosive toothpaste. The null hypotheses tested were that tooth erosion after brushing with the toothpaste would not be different from brushing with water and that a 1-hour delay before brushing would not reduce tooth erosion. Forty bovine enamel slabs were embedded, polished, and subjected to baseline profilometry. Specimens were bathed in hydrochloric acid for 10 minutes to simulate stomach acid exposure before post-acid profilometry. Toothbrushing was then simulated with a cross-brushing machine and followed by postbrushing profilometry. Group 1 was brushed with water; group 2 was brushed with a 50:50 toothpastewater slurry; and groups 3 and 4 were immersed in artificial saliva for 1 hour before brushing with water or the toothpaste slurry, respectively. The depth of enamel loss was analyzed and compared using 1-way analysis of variance and post hoc testing (α = 0.05). Greater enamel loss was measured in groups brushed with toothpaste than in groups brushed with water. One-hour immersion in artificial saliva significantly reduced enamel loss when teeth were brushed with water (group 3; P < 0.05) but not with toothpaste (group 4). This study established a protocol for measuring enamel loss resulting from erosion followed by toothbrush abrasion. The results confirmed the abrasive action of toothpaste on acidsoftened enamel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-68
Number of pages6
JournalGeneral Dentistry
Volume65
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Toothpastes
Dental Enamel
Tooth Erosion
Water
Artificial Saliva
Toothbrushing
Tooth Loss
Acids
Hydrochloric Acid
Immersion
Stomach
Analysis of Variance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Protocol for measurement of enamel loss from brushing with an anti-erosive toothpaste after an acidic episode. / Dehghan, Mojdeh; Ozorio, Jose Estevam Vieira; Chanin, Simon; Versluis, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin.

In: General Dentistry, Vol. 65, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 63-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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