Providing pharmaceutical care: Are pharmacy students beneficial to patients?

Marie Chisholm-Burns, David W. Hawkins, A. Thomas Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated pharmaceutical care provided to patients by Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students during the clerkship phase of their education. Objectives of the study were: (1) to teach pharmacy students how to identify, document, solve, and prevent medication-related problems; (2) to document the number and types of recommendations made by PharmD students to physicians; (3) to determine physicians' acceptance rate of these suggestions;and (4) to determine the potential impact of students' recommendations on patient care. Fifteen PharmD students enrolled at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy assigned to general medicine or family medicine services at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital during July 1995 through March 1996 participated in the study. Approximately 86% of the students' recommendations were accepted by each medicine team. Two pharmacists evaluated each accepted recommendation by using Hatoum's criteria for assessing potential impact on patient care. Approximately 70% of the accepted recommendations were judged to have a significant, very significant, or extremely significant potential impact on patient care outcome. The authors conclude that, with proper supervision, pharmacy students can have a positive impact on patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-375
Number of pages6
JournalHospital Pharmacy
Volume32
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pharmacy Students
Pharmaceutical Services
Patient Care
Students
Medicine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Physicians
Pharmacists
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Providing pharmaceutical care : Are pharmacy students beneficial to patients? / Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Hawkins, David W.; Taylor, A. Thomas.

In: Hospital Pharmacy, Vol. 32, No. 3, 03.1997, p. 370-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Chisholm-Burns, Marie ; Hawkins, David W. ; Taylor, A. Thomas. / Providing pharmaceutical care : Are pharmacy students beneficial to patients?. In: Hospital Pharmacy. 1997 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 370-375.
@article{93fc91fd4fb546e2bfb687004e5d1b37,
title = "Providing pharmaceutical care: Are pharmacy students beneficial to patients?",
abstract = "This study evaluated pharmaceutical care provided to patients by Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students during the clerkship phase of their education. Objectives of the study were: (1) to teach pharmacy students how to identify, document, solve, and prevent medication-related problems; (2) to document the number and types of recommendations made by PharmD students to physicians; (3) to determine physicians' acceptance rate of these suggestions;and (4) to determine the potential impact of students' recommendations on patient care. Fifteen PharmD students enrolled at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy assigned to general medicine or family medicine services at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital during July 1995 through March 1996 participated in the study. Approximately 86{\%} of the students' recommendations were accepted by each medicine team. Two pharmacists evaluated each accepted recommendation by using Hatoum's criteria for assessing potential impact on patient care. Approximately 70{\%} of the accepted recommendations were judged to have a significant, very significant, or extremely significant potential impact on patient care outcome. The authors conclude that, with proper supervision, pharmacy students can have a positive impact on patient care.",
author = "Marie Chisholm-Burns and Hawkins, {David W.} and Taylor, {A. Thomas}",
year = "1997",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "370--375",
journal = "Hospital Pharmacy",
issn = "0018-5787",
publisher = "Facts and Comparisons",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Providing pharmaceutical care

T2 - Are pharmacy students beneficial to patients?

AU - Chisholm-Burns, Marie

AU - Hawkins, David W.

AU - Taylor, A. Thomas

PY - 1997/3

Y1 - 1997/3

N2 - This study evaluated pharmaceutical care provided to patients by Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students during the clerkship phase of their education. Objectives of the study were: (1) to teach pharmacy students how to identify, document, solve, and prevent medication-related problems; (2) to document the number and types of recommendations made by PharmD students to physicians; (3) to determine physicians' acceptance rate of these suggestions;and (4) to determine the potential impact of students' recommendations on patient care. Fifteen PharmD students enrolled at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy assigned to general medicine or family medicine services at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital during July 1995 through March 1996 participated in the study. Approximately 86% of the students' recommendations were accepted by each medicine team. Two pharmacists evaluated each accepted recommendation by using Hatoum's criteria for assessing potential impact on patient care. Approximately 70% of the accepted recommendations were judged to have a significant, very significant, or extremely significant potential impact on patient care outcome. The authors conclude that, with proper supervision, pharmacy students can have a positive impact on patient care.

AB - This study evaluated pharmaceutical care provided to patients by Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students during the clerkship phase of their education. Objectives of the study were: (1) to teach pharmacy students how to identify, document, solve, and prevent medication-related problems; (2) to document the number and types of recommendations made by PharmD students to physicians; (3) to determine physicians' acceptance rate of these suggestions;and (4) to determine the potential impact of students' recommendations on patient care. Fifteen PharmD students enrolled at the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy assigned to general medicine or family medicine services at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital during July 1995 through March 1996 participated in the study. Approximately 86% of the students' recommendations were accepted by each medicine team. Two pharmacists evaluated each accepted recommendation by using Hatoum's criteria for assessing potential impact on patient care. Approximately 70% of the accepted recommendations were judged to have a significant, very significant, or extremely significant potential impact on patient care outcome. The authors conclude that, with proper supervision, pharmacy students can have a positive impact on patient care.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030897887&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030897887&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:0030897887

VL - 32

SP - 370

EP - 375

JO - Hospital Pharmacy

JF - Hospital Pharmacy

SN - 0018-5787

IS - 3

ER -