Psychosexual aspects of vulvovaginal pain

Sophie Bergeron, Wendy Likes, Marc Steben

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vulvovaginal pain problems are major health concerns in women of childbearing age. Controlled studies have shown that vulvovaginal pain can adversely affect women and their partners' general psychological well-being, relationship adjustment, and overall quality of life. These women have significantly lower levels of sexual desire, arousal, and satisfaction, as well as a lower intercourse frequency than normal controls. They also report more anxiety and depression, in addition to more distress about their body image and genital self-image. Empirical studies indicate that specific psychological and relationship factors may increase vulvovaginal pain intensity and its psychosexual sequelae. Randomized clinical trials have shown that psychosexual interventions, namely cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), are efficacious in reducing vulvovaginal pain and improving associated psychosexual outcomes. Women reporting significant psychological, sexual, and/or relationship distress should be referred for psychosexual treatment. A multimodal approach to care integrating psychosexual and medical management is thought to be optimal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)991-999
Number of pages9
JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Pain
Psychology
Social Adjustment
Body Image
Cognitive Therapy
Arousal
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Depression
Health
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Psychosexual aspects of vulvovaginal pain. / Bergeron, Sophie; Likes, Wendy; Steben, Marc.

In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 28, No. 7, 01.01.2014, p. 991-999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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