Psychosocial Comorbidities Related to Return to Work Rates Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Eleanor R. Turi, Yvette Conley, Elizabeth Crago, Paula Sherwood, Samuel M. Poloyac, Dianxu Ren, Ansley Stanfill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Ability to return to work (RTW) after stroke has been shown to have positive psychosocial benefits on survivors. Although one-fifth of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) survivors suffer from poor psychosocial outcomes, the relationship between such outcomes and RTW post-stroke is not clear. This project explores the relationship between age, gender, race, marital status, anxiety and depression and RTW 3 and 12 months post-aSAH. Methods Demographic and clinical variables were collected from the electronic medical record at the time of aSAH admission. Anxiety and depression were assessed at 3 and 12 months post-aSAH using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck’s Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in 121 subjects. RTW for previously employed patients was dichotomized into yes/no at their 3 or 12 month follow-up appointment. Results Older age was significantly associated with failure to RTW at 3 and 12 months post-aSAH (p = 0.003 and 0.011, respectively). Female gender showed a trending but nonsignificant relationship with RTW at 12 months (p = 0.081). High scores of depression, State anxiety, and Trait anxiety all had significant associations with failure to RTW 12 months post-aSAH (0.007 ≤ p ≤ 0.048). At 3 months, there was a significant interaction between older age and high State or Trait anxiety with failure to RTW 12 months post-aSAH (p = 0.025, 0.042 respectively). Conclusions Patients who are older and suffer from poor psychological outcomes are at an increased risk of failing to RTW 1-year post-aSAH. Our interactive results give us information about which patients should be streamlined for therapy to target their psychosocial needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-211
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2019

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Return to Work
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Comorbidity
Anxiety
Depression
Survivors
Stroke
Equipment and Supplies
Aptitude
Electronic Health Records
Marital Status
Appointments and Schedules
Demography
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Occupational Therapy

Cite this

Psychosocial Comorbidities Related to Return to Work Rates Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. / Turi, Eleanor R.; Conley, Yvette; Crago, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Paula; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Ren, Dianxu; Stanfill, Ansley.

In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, Vol. 29, No. 1, 15.03.2019, p. 205-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turi, Eleanor R. ; Conley, Yvette ; Crago, Elizabeth ; Sherwood, Paula ; Poloyac, Samuel M. ; Ren, Dianxu ; Stanfill, Ansley. / Psychosocial Comorbidities Related to Return to Work Rates Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation. 2019 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 205-211.
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AB - Purpose Ability to return to work (RTW) after stroke has been shown to have positive psychosocial benefits on survivors. Although one-fifth of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) survivors suffer from poor psychosocial outcomes, the relationship between such outcomes and RTW post-stroke is not clear. This project explores the relationship between age, gender, race, marital status, anxiety and depression and RTW 3 and 12 months post-aSAH. Methods Demographic and clinical variables were collected from the electronic medical record at the time of aSAH admission. Anxiety and depression were assessed at 3 and 12 months post-aSAH using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck’s Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in 121 subjects. RTW for previously employed patients was dichotomized into yes/no at their 3 or 12 month follow-up appointment. Results Older age was significantly associated with failure to RTW at 3 and 12 months post-aSAH (p = 0.003 and 0.011, respectively). Female gender showed a trending but nonsignificant relationship with RTW at 12 months (p = 0.081). High scores of depression, State anxiety, and Trait anxiety all had significant associations with failure to RTW 12 months post-aSAH (0.007 ≤ p ≤ 0.048). At 3 months, there was a significant interaction between older age and high State or Trait anxiety with failure to RTW 12 months post-aSAH (p = 0.025, 0.042 respectively). Conclusions Patients who are older and suffer from poor psychological outcomes are at an increased risk of failing to RTW 1-year post-aSAH. Our interactive results give us information about which patients should be streamlined for therapy to target their psychosocial needs.

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