Pulmonary function changes after nebulised and intravenous frusemide in ventilated premature infants

Vishwanath G. Prabhu, Martin Keszler, Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims-To compare the effects of a single dose of frusemide administered either intravenously or by nebulisation on pulmonary mechanics in premature infants with evolving chronic lung disease. Methods-The effect of frusemide on pulmonary mechanics was studied at a median postnatal age of 23 (range 14- 52) days in 19 premature infants at 24 to 30 weeks gestational age, who had been dependent on mechanical ventilation since birth. Frusemide (1 mg/kg/body weight) was administered, in random order, intravenously and by nebulisation, on two separate occasions 24 hours apart. Pulmonary function studies were performed before and at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after administration of frusemide. Urine was collected for six hours immediately before and for six hours after administration of frusemide. Results-Nebulised frusemide increased the tidal volume 31(SE 11.5)% and compliance 34 (SE 12)% after two hours, whereas no change in either was noted for up to two hours after intravenous frusemide administration. Neither intravenous nor nebulised frusemide had any effect on airway resistance. Six hour urine output increased from a mean (SE) of 3.3 (0.4) ml/kg/hour to 5.9 (0.8) ml/kg/hour following intravenous frusemide administration while nebulised frusemide had no effect on urine output. Urinary sodium, potassium, and chloride losses were also significantly higher after intravenous frusemide, whereas nebulised frusemide did not increase urinary electrolyte losses. Conclusion-Single dose nebulised frusemide improves pulmonary function in premature infants with evolving chronic lung disease without adverse effects on fluid and electrolyte balance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Furosemide
Premature Infants
Lung
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Urine
Mechanics
Intravenous Administration
Lung Diseases
Chronic Disease
Airway Resistance
Potassium Chloride
Tidal Volume
Artificial Respiration
Sodium Chloride
Electrolytes
Gestational Age
Compliance
Body Weight
Parturition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Pulmonary function changes after nebulised and intravenous frusemide in ventilated premature infants. / Prabhu, Vishwanath G.; Keszler, Martin; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy.

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, Vol. 77, No. 1, 01.01.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aims-To compare the effects of a single dose of frusemide administered either intravenously or by nebulisation on pulmonary mechanics in premature infants with evolving chronic lung disease. Methods-The effect of frusemide on pulmonary mechanics was studied at a median postnatal age of 23 (range 14- 52) days in 19 premature infants at 24 to 30 weeks gestational age, who had been dependent on mechanical ventilation since birth. Frusemide (1 mg/kg/body weight) was administered, in random order, intravenously and by nebulisation, on two separate occasions 24 hours apart. Pulmonary function studies were performed before and at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after administration of frusemide. Urine was collected for six hours immediately before and for six hours after administration of frusemide. Results-Nebulised frusemide increased the tidal volume 31(SE 11.5){\%} and compliance 34 (SE 12){\%} after two hours, whereas no change in either was noted for up to two hours after intravenous frusemide administration. Neither intravenous nor nebulised frusemide had any effect on airway resistance. Six hour urine output increased from a mean (SE) of 3.3 (0.4) ml/kg/hour to 5.9 (0.8) ml/kg/hour following intravenous frusemide administration while nebulised frusemide had no effect on urine output. Urinary sodium, potassium, and chloride losses were also significantly higher after intravenous frusemide, whereas nebulised frusemide did not increase urinary electrolyte losses. Conclusion-Single dose nebulised frusemide improves pulmonary function in premature infants with evolving chronic lung disease without adverse effects on fluid and electrolyte balance.",
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