Pulse pressure in acute stroke is an independent predictor of long-term mortality

Konstantinos N. Vemmos, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Konstantinos Spengos, Efstathios Manios, Michael Daffertshofer, Vassilios Kotsis, John P. Lekakis, Nikolaos Zakopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The management of blood pressure (BP) during the acute phase of stroke remains a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between long-term mortality and BP values in acute stroke by means of BP monitoring. We studied a consecutive series of 198 first-ever acute stroke patients. BP monitoring was initiated in all subjects within 24 h of ictus. One year after stroke onset, 34 (17.7%) patients had died. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed only age, level of consciousness on admission, lacunar stroke and 24-hour pulse pressure (24-hour PP) as significant outcome predictors. The hazards ratio for 1-year mortality associated with every 10 mm Hg increase in 24 h PP was 1.39 (95% CI: 1.04-1.86, p = 0.028). The present results demonstrate that increasing 24-hour PP levels in patients with acute stroke are independently associated with higher long-term mortality. This may have implications in acute stroke BP management and warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-36
Number of pages7
JournalCerebrovascular Diseases
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 7 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Stroke
Blood Pressure
Mortality
Lacunar Stroke
Consciousness
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Vemmos, K. N., Tsivgoulis, G., Spengos, K., Manios, E., Daffertshofer, M., Kotsis, V., ... Zakopoulos, N. (2004). Pulse pressure in acute stroke is an independent predictor of long-term mortality. Cerebrovascular Diseases, 18(1), 30-36. https://doi.org/10.1159/000078605

Pulse pressure in acute stroke is an independent predictor of long-term mortality. / Vemmos, Konstantinos N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Spengos, Konstantinos; Manios, Efstathios; Daffertshofer, Michael; Kotsis, Vassilios; Lekakis, John P.; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos.

In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 18, No. 1, 07.07.2004, p. 30-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vemmos, KN, Tsivgoulis, G, Spengos, K, Manios, E, Daffertshofer, M, Kotsis, V, Lekakis, JP & Zakopoulos, N 2004, 'Pulse pressure in acute stroke is an independent predictor of long-term mortality', Cerebrovascular Diseases, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 30-36. https://doi.org/10.1159/000078605
Vemmos, Konstantinos N. ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Spengos, Konstantinos ; Manios, Efstathios ; Daffertshofer, Michael ; Kotsis, Vassilios ; Lekakis, John P. ; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos. / Pulse pressure in acute stroke is an independent predictor of long-term mortality. In: Cerebrovascular Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 30-36.
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