Pythium insidiosum

A rare necrotizing orbital and facial infection

Maria Kirzhner, Sandra Arnold, Cari Lyle, Leonel L. Mendoza, James Fleming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pythium insidiosum, also known as "swamp cancer," has been long known for its destructive effects on plants and animals. Infections with this fungus-like organism typically occur in temperate, tropical, and subtropical regions [1]. Human infection with P insidiosum, although exceedingly rare, is characterized by invasion of the cornea, cutaneous, subcutaneous, and orbital tissues with eosinophilic, tumor-like masses demonstrating arterial tropism [1, 2]. In most cases, patients have a history of recent exposure to wet environments [1]. If left untreated, P insidiosum is fatal, because it is an angioinvasive organism that leads to thrombosis and tissue ischemia. Reports of most human cases are from Thailand, with only 4 well documented orbital cases to date in the United States and Australia [1, 3, 4].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e10-e13
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pythium
Tropism
Mycoses
Wetlands
Subcutaneous Tissue
Thailand
Infection
Cornea
Neoplasms
Thrombosis
Ischemia
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pythium insidiosum : A rare necrotizing orbital and facial infection. / Kirzhner, Maria; Arnold, Sandra; Lyle, Cari; Mendoza, Leonel L.; Fleming, James.

In: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. e10-e13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3bcb74af2c6b4c80a1bda77dfe8bf0c3,
title = "Pythium insidiosum: A rare necrotizing orbital and facial infection",
abstract = "Pythium insidiosum, also known as {"}swamp cancer,{"} has been long known for its destructive effects on plants and animals. Infections with this fungus-like organism typically occur in temperate, tropical, and subtropical regions [1]. Human infection with P insidiosum, although exceedingly rare, is characterized by invasion of the cornea, cutaneous, subcutaneous, and orbital tissues with eosinophilic, tumor-like masses demonstrating arterial tropism [1, 2]. In most cases, patients have a history of recent exposure to wet environments [1]. If left untreated, P insidiosum is fatal, because it is an angioinvasive organism that leads to thrombosis and tissue ischemia. Reports of most human cases are from Thailand, with only 4 well documented orbital cases to date in the United States and Australia [1, 3, 4].",
author = "Maria Kirzhner and Sandra Arnold and Cari Lyle and Mendoza, {Leonel L.} and James Fleming",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/jpids/piu015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "e10--e13",
journal = "Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society",
issn = "2048-7193",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pythium insidiosum

T2 - A rare necrotizing orbital and facial infection

AU - Kirzhner, Maria

AU - Arnold, Sandra

AU - Lyle, Cari

AU - Mendoza, Leonel L.

AU - Fleming, James

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Pythium insidiosum, also known as "swamp cancer," has been long known for its destructive effects on plants and animals. Infections with this fungus-like organism typically occur in temperate, tropical, and subtropical regions [1]. Human infection with P insidiosum, although exceedingly rare, is characterized by invasion of the cornea, cutaneous, subcutaneous, and orbital tissues with eosinophilic, tumor-like masses demonstrating arterial tropism [1, 2]. In most cases, patients have a history of recent exposure to wet environments [1]. If left untreated, P insidiosum is fatal, because it is an angioinvasive organism that leads to thrombosis and tissue ischemia. Reports of most human cases are from Thailand, with only 4 well documented orbital cases to date in the United States and Australia [1, 3, 4].

AB - Pythium insidiosum, also known as "swamp cancer," has been long known for its destructive effects on plants and animals. Infections with this fungus-like organism typically occur in temperate, tropical, and subtropical regions [1]. Human infection with P insidiosum, although exceedingly rare, is characterized by invasion of the cornea, cutaneous, subcutaneous, and orbital tissues with eosinophilic, tumor-like masses demonstrating arterial tropism [1, 2]. In most cases, patients have a history of recent exposure to wet environments [1]. If left untreated, P insidiosum is fatal, because it is an angioinvasive organism that leads to thrombosis and tissue ischemia. Reports of most human cases are from Thailand, with only 4 well documented orbital cases to date in the United States and Australia [1, 3, 4].

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85006210816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85006210816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/jpids/piu015

DO - 10.1093/jpids/piu015

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - e10-e13

JO - Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

JF - Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

SN - 2048-7193

IS - 1

ER -