QSource quality initiative. Reversing the diabetes epidemic in Tennessee.

James Bailey, Deborah V. Gibson, Manoj Jain, Stephanie A. Connelly, Kathryn M. Ryder, Samuel Dagogo-Jack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper summarizes the results of a recent report on diabetes in Tennessee. Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Tennessee. In 2001, an estimated 7.7% of the population was diabetic, an increase from 5.8% a decade earlier. This increase is largely due to widespread unhealthy eating habits, physical inactivity, and associated obesity. The majority of diabetes is preventable and can be effectively treated through daily exercise and a healthy diet. Diabetes prevention efforts in Tennessee schools and communities, however, are grossly inadequate. Providers and payers underemphasize prevention. Since the causes of diabetes can be traced to childhood habits, early prevention is the key to reversing the diabetes epidemic. Immediate statewide action must be taken to promote daily exercise and decrease access to high-calorie, high-fat "junk" food in our schools and communities. Physicians, health professional organizations, health plans, government, churches, schools, and employers must work together to battle the diabetes epidemic through public education, community-wide health promotion programs, and efforts to improve quality of diabetes care for all Tennesseans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-563
Number of pages5
JournalTennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association
Volume96
Issue number12
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Exercise
Quality of Health Care
Health
Feeding Behavior
Health Promotion
Habits
Obesity
Fats
Physicians
Education
Food
Population
Healthy Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

QSource quality initiative. Reversing the diabetes epidemic in Tennessee. / Bailey, James; Gibson, Deborah V.; Jain, Manoj; Connelly, Stephanie A.; Ryder, Kathryn M.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel.

In: Tennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association, Vol. 96, No. 12, 01.01.2003, p. 559-563.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bailey, James ; Gibson, Deborah V. ; Jain, Manoj ; Connelly, Stephanie A. ; Ryder, Kathryn M. ; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel. / QSource quality initiative. Reversing the diabetes epidemic in Tennessee. In: Tennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association. 2003 ; Vol. 96, No. 12. pp. 559-563.
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