QTL analysis and genomewide mutagenesis in mice

Complementary genetic approaches to the dissection of complex traits

John K. Belknap, Robert Hitzemann, John C. Crabbe, Tamara J. Phillips, Kari J. Buck, Robert Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quantitative genetics and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping have undergone a revolution in the last decade. Progress in the next decade promises to be at least as rapid, and strategies for fine-mapping QTLs and identifying underlying genes will be radically revised. In this Commentary we address several key issues: first, we revisit a perennial challenge - how to identify individual genes and allelic variants underlying QTLs. We compare current practice and procedures in QTL analysis with novel methods and resources that are just now being introduced. We argue that there is no one standard of proof for showing QTL = gene; rather, evidence from several sources must be carefully assembled until there is only one reasonable conclusion. Second, we compare QTL analysis with whole-genome mutagenesis in mice and point out some of the strengths and weakness of both of these phenotype-driven methods. Finally, we explore the advantages and disadvantages of naturally occurring vs mutagen-induced polymorphisms. We argue that these two complementary genetic methods have much to offer in efforts to highlight genes and pathways most likely to influence the susceptibility and progression of common diseases in human populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-15
Number of pages11
JournalBehavior Genetics
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2001

Fingerprint

Quantitative Trait Loci
dissection
mutagenesis
Mutagenesis
Dissection
quantitative trait loci
gene
mice
Genes
Mutagens
genes
Disease Progression
phenotype
polymorphism
genetic traits
genome
quantitative genetics
Genome
Phenotype
human population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

QTL analysis and genomewide mutagenesis in mice : Complementary genetic approaches to the dissection of complex traits. / Belknap, John K.; Hitzemann, Robert; Crabbe, John C.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Buck, Kari J.; Williams, Robert.

In: Behavior Genetics, Vol. 31, No. 1, 31.08.2001, p. 5-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Belknap, John K. ; Hitzemann, Robert ; Crabbe, John C. ; Phillips, Tamara J. ; Buck, Kari J. ; Williams, Robert. / QTL analysis and genomewide mutagenesis in mice : Complementary genetic approaches to the dissection of complex traits. In: Behavior Genetics. 2001 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 5-15.
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