Quantitative analysis of tooth surface loss associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease

A longitudinal clinical study

Daranee Versluis, Maria R. Pintado, Antheunis Versluis, Carol Dunn, Ralph Delong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Acid regurgitation resulting from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes dissolution of tooth structure. The authors conducted a longitudinal clinical study to measure tooth surface loss associated with GERD. Methods. The authors made replicas of dental impressions obtained from 12 participants with GERD and six control participants at baseline and six months. Using an optical scanner, they digitized the tooth surfaces of these replicas. They then analyzed the volume of tooth surface loss and characterized it as noncontact erosion or erosion/attrition. Results. Mean (standard deviation) volume loss per tooth in participants with GERD (0.18 [0.12] cubic millimeter) was significantly higher than that in control participants (0.06 [0.03] mm 3; t test; P < .013). Nine participants with GERD exhibited tooth surface loss with characteristics of erosion (noncontact erosion in three participants, erosion/attrition in eight participants). Conclusions. Tooth surface loss in participants with GERD was significantly greater than that in control participants. The pattern of surface loss was characteristic of erosion in noncontact areas and around contact areas. Clinical Implications. Anterior and posterior teeth of participants with GERD were affected by erosive tooth wear. In addition, the amount of erosive tooth wear on occlusal surfaces was twice as high when there was evidence of attrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-285
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume143
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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Tooth Loss
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Longitudinal Studies
Tooth
Tooth Wear
Clinical Studies
Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Quantitative analysis of tooth surface loss associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease : A longitudinal clinical study. / Versluis, Daranee; Pintado, Maria R.; Versluis, Antheunis; Dunn, Carol; Delong, Ralph.

In: Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 143, No. 3, 01.01.2012, p. 278-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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