Quantitative Assessment of Visceral Obesity and Postoperative Colon Cancer Outcomes

Oluwatobi O. Ozoya, Erin M. Siegel, Thejal Srikumar, Amanda M. Bloomer, Amanda DeRenzis, David Shibata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Quantitative computed tomography (CT) assessment of visceral adiposity may be superior to body mass index (BMI) as a predictor of surgical morbidity. We sought to examine the association of CT measures of obesity and BMI with short-term postoperative outcomes in colon cancer patients. Methods: In this retrospective study, 110 patients treated with colectomy for stage I–III colon cancer were classified as obese or non-obese by preoperative CT-based measures of adiposity or BMI [obese: BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, visceral fat area (VFA) to subcutaneous fat area ratio (V/S) ≥0.4, and VFA > 100 cm2]. Postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were compared. Results: Obese patients, by V/S and VFA but not BMI, were more likely to be male and have preexisting hypertension and diabetes. The overall complication rate was 25.5%, and there were no mortalities. Obese patients by VFA (with a trend for V/S but not BMI) were more likely to develop postoperative complications as compared to patients classified as non-obese: VFA (30.5 vs.10.7%, p = 0.03), V/S (29.2 vs. 9.5%, p = 0.05), and BMI (32.4 vs. 21.9%, p = 0.23). Conclusions: Elevated visceral obesity quantified by CT is associated with the presence of key metabolic comorbidities and increased postoperative morbidity and may be superior to BMI for risk stratification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-542
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Abdominal Obesity
Colonic Neoplasms
Body Mass Index
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Tomography
Adiposity
Morbidity
Mortality
Colectomy
Subcutaneous Fat
Comorbidity
Retrospective Studies
Obesity
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Quantitative Assessment of Visceral Obesity and Postoperative Colon Cancer Outcomes. / Ozoya, Oluwatobi O.; Siegel, Erin M.; Srikumar, Thejal; Bloomer, Amanda M.; DeRenzis, Amanda; Shibata, David.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 534-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozoya, Oluwatobi O. ; Siegel, Erin M. ; Srikumar, Thejal ; Bloomer, Amanda M. ; DeRenzis, Amanda ; Shibata, David. / Quantitative Assessment of Visceral Obesity and Postoperative Colon Cancer Outcomes. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 534-542.
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N2 - Background: Quantitative computed tomography (CT) assessment of visceral adiposity may be superior to body mass index (BMI) as a predictor of surgical morbidity. We sought to examine the association of CT measures of obesity and BMI with short-term postoperative outcomes in colon cancer patients. Methods: In this retrospective study, 110 patients treated with colectomy for stage I–III colon cancer were classified as obese or non-obese by preoperative CT-based measures of adiposity or BMI [obese: BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, visceral fat area (VFA) to subcutaneous fat area ratio (V/S) ≥0.4, and VFA > 100 cm2]. Postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were compared. Results: Obese patients, by V/S and VFA but not BMI, were more likely to be male and have preexisting hypertension and diabetes. The overall complication rate was 25.5%, and there were no mortalities. Obese patients by VFA (with a trend for V/S but not BMI) were more likely to develop postoperative complications as compared to patients classified as non-obese: VFA (30.5 vs.10.7%, p = 0.03), V/S (29.2 vs. 9.5%, p = 0.05), and BMI (32.4 vs. 21.9%, p = 0.23). Conclusions: Elevated visceral obesity quantified by CT is associated with the presence of key metabolic comorbidities and increased postoperative morbidity and may be superior to BMI for risk stratification.

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