Quantitative evaluation of the myocardial preservative characteristics of nifedipine during hypothermic myocardial ischemia

W. Y. Moores, John Mack, W. P. Dembitsky, W. H. Heydorn, P. O. Daily

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nifedipine, a slow calcium-channel blocker, has been used to preserve myocardial function in the ischemic heart. To quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of nifedipine as a cardioplegic agent during moderate hypothermia (28°C), 15 pigs were evaluated on total and right heart bypass with measurement at normothermia and after 1 hour of hypothermic ischemia of stroke volume, coronary blood flow, myocardial oxygen consumption, and lactate extraction. Myocardial tissue gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) were continuously monitored. Animals were divided into three groups: (1) hypothermic ischemia, (2) hypothermic ischemia with infusion of nifedipine carrier without nifedipine, and (3) hypothermic ischemia with nifedipine and its carrier. A significant decrease in stroke volume was seen in all three groups; however, the depression was significantly greater following hypothermic ischemia than following cardioplegia with either nifedipine or its carrier. The mean recovery value of stroke volume was highest in the nifedipine group, but this difference between nifedipine and its carrier alone did not reach statistical significance. Coronary blood flow, myocardial oxygen consumption, lactate extraction, and tissue gases failed to substantiate a significant benefit when nifedipine was compared with its carrier alone. We conclude that under these hypothermic conditions, no proven statistically significant advantage was noted in the nifedipine group when compared with the nifedipine carrier group in swine. However, both nifedipine and the carrier were superior as a myocardial preservative when compared with hypothermic ischemic arrest alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-920
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume90
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Nifedipine
Myocardial Ischemia
Ischemia
Stroke Volume
Oxygen Consumption
Lactic Acid
Swine
Gases
Right Heart Bypass
Induced Heart Arrest
Calcium Channel Blockers
Hypothermia
Carbon Dioxide
Oxygen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Quantitative evaluation of the myocardial preservative characteristics of nifedipine during hypothermic myocardial ischemia. / Moores, W. Y.; Mack, John; Dembitsky, W. P.; Heydorn, W. H.; Daily, P. O.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 90, No. 6, 01.12.1985, p. 912-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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