Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana

Neil J. Hausmann, Thomas E. Juenger, Saunak Sen, Kirk A. Stowe, Todd E. Dawson, Ellen L. Simms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phenotypic plasticity is an important response mechanism of plants to environmental heterogeneity. Here, we explored the genetic basis of plastic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to water deficit by experimentally mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in two recombinant inbred populations (Cvi x Ler and Ler x Col). We detected genetic variation and significant genotype-by-environment interactions for many traits related to water use. We also mapped 26 QTL, including six for carbon isotope composition (δ13C). Negative genetic correlations between fruit length and fruit production as well as between flowering time and branch production were corroborated by QTL colocalization, suggesting these correlations are due to pleiotropy or physical linkage. Water-limited plants were more apically dominant with greater root:shoot ratios and higher δ13C (higher water-use efficiency) when compared to well-watered plants. Many of the QTL effects for these traits interacted significantly with the irrigation treatment, suggesting that the observed phenotypic plasticity is genetically based. We specifically searched for epistatic (QTL-QTL) interactions using a two-dimensional genome scan, which allowed us to detect epistasis regardless of additive genetic effects. We found several significant QTL-QTL interactions including three that exhibited environmental dependence. These results provide preliminary evidence for proposed genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-96
Number of pages16
JournalEvolution
Volume59
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Quantitative Trait Loci
phenotypic plasticity
Arabidopsis
quantitative trait loci
Arabidopsis thaliana
Water
pleiotropy
epistasis
fruit production
root-shoot ratio
water
water use efficiency
flowering
water use
carbon isotope
genetic variation
genotype
genome
fruit
plastic

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Hausmann, N. J., Juenger, T. E., Sen, S., Stowe, K. A., Dawson, T. E., & Simms, E. L. (2005). Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Evolution, 59(1), 81-96.

Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana. / Hausmann, Neil J.; Juenger, Thomas E.; Sen, Saunak; Stowe, Kirk A.; Dawson, Todd E.; Simms, Ellen L.

In: Evolution, Vol. 59, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 81-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hausmann, NJ, Juenger, TE, Sen, S, Stowe, KA, Dawson, TE & Simms, EL 2005, 'Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana', Evolution, vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 81-96.
Hausmann, Neil J. ; Juenger, Thomas E. ; Sen, Saunak ; Stowe, Kirk A. ; Dawson, Todd E. ; Simms, Ellen L. / Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana. In: Evolution. 2005 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 81-96.
@article{e1b58ae982b94153a5b4580a9edbe3d7,
title = "Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana",
abstract = "Phenotypic plasticity is an important response mechanism of plants to environmental heterogeneity. Here, we explored the genetic basis of plastic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to water deficit by experimentally mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in two recombinant inbred populations (Cvi x Ler and Ler x Col). We detected genetic variation and significant genotype-by-environment interactions for many traits related to water use. We also mapped 26 QTL, including six for carbon isotope composition (δ13C). Negative genetic correlations between fruit length and fruit production as well as between flowering time and branch production were corroborated by QTL colocalization, suggesting these correlations are due to pleiotropy or physical linkage. Water-limited plants were more apically dominant with greater root:shoot ratios and higher δ13C (higher water-use efficiency) when compared to well-watered plants. Many of the QTL effects for these traits interacted significantly with the irrigation treatment, suggesting that the observed phenotypic plasticity is genetically based. We specifically searched for epistatic (QTL-QTL) interactions using a two-dimensional genome scan, which allowed us to detect epistasis regardless of additive genetic effects. We found several significant QTL-QTL interactions including three that exhibited environmental dependence. These results provide preliminary evidence for proposed genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.",
author = "Hausmann, {Neil J.} and Juenger, {Thomas E.} and Saunak Sen and Stowe, {Kirk A.} and Dawson, {Todd E.} and Simms, {Ellen L.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "81--96",
journal = "Evolution; international journal of organic evolution",
issn = "0014-3820",
publisher = "Society for the Study of Evolution",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantitative trait loci affecting δ13C and response to differential water availibility in Arabidopsis thaliana

AU - Hausmann, Neil J.

AU - Juenger, Thomas E.

AU - Sen, Saunak

AU - Stowe, Kirk A.

AU - Dawson, Todd E.

AU - Simms, Ellen L.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Phenotypic plasticity is an important response mechanism of plants to environmental heterogeneity. Here, we explored the genetic basis of plastic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to water deficit by experimentally mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in two recombinant inbred populations (Cvi x Ler and Ler x Col). We detected genetic variation and significant genotype-by-environment interactions for many traits related to water use. We also mapped 26 QTL, including six for carbon isotope composition (δ13C). Negative genetic correlations between fruit length and fruit production as well as between flowering time and branch production were corroborated by QTL colocalization, suggesting these correlations are due to pleiotropy or physical linkage. Water-limited plants were more apically dominant with greater root:shoot ratios and higher δ13C (higher water-use efficiency) when compared to well-watered plants. Many of the QTL effects for these traits interacted significantly with the irrigation treatment, suggesting that the observed phenotypic plasticity is genetically based. We specifically searched for epistatic (QTL-QTL) interactions using a two-dimensional genome scan, which allowed us to detect epistasis regardless of additive genetic effects. We found several significant QTL-QTL interactions including three that exhibited environmental dependence. These results provide preliminary evidence for proposed genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.

AB - Phenotypic plasticity is an important response mechanism of plants to environmental heterogeneity. Here, we explored the genetic basis of plastic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to water deficit by experimentally mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in two recombinant inbred populations (Cvi x Ler and Ler x Col). We detected genetic variation and significant genotype-by-environment interactions for many traits related to water use. We also mapped 26 QTL, including six for carbon isotope composition (δ13C). Negative genetic correlations between fruit length and fruit production as well as between flowering time and branch production were corroborated by QTL colocalization, suggesting these correlations are due to pleiotropy or physical linkage. Water-limited plants were more apically dominant with greater root:shoot ratios and higher δ13C (higher water-use efficiency) when compared to well-watered plants. Many of the QTL effects for these traits interacted significantly with the irrigation treatment, suggesting that the observed phenotypic plasticity is genetically based. We specifically searched for epistatic (QTL-QTL) interactions using a two-dimensional genome scan, which allowed us to detect epistasis regardless of additive genetic effects. We found several significant QTL-QTL interactions including three that exhibited environmental dependence. These results provide preliminary evidence for proposed genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=13244275218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=13244275218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 81

EP - 96

JO - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution

JF - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution

SN - 0014-3820

IS - 1

ER -