Quinolinic acid in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric manifestations

Scott A. Vogelgesang, Melvyn P. Heyes, Sterling G. West, Andres M. Salazar, Peter P. Sfikakis, Robert N. Lipnick, Gary Klipple, George C. Tsokos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the relationship between quinolinic acid, a neuroactive metabolite of L-tryptophan, and neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Forty specimens of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained from 39 patients with SLE who were evaluated for 40 episodes of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. The diagnosis of of neuropsychiatric dysfunction was determined clinically. CSF and serum specimens were analyzed for levels of quinolinic acid without knowledge of the clinical diagnosis. Results. Neuropsychiatric dysfunction attributed to SLE (NPSLE) was confirmed in 30 patient-episodes (Group 1), whereas in the other 10 (Group 2) other etiologies were felt to explain their CNS dysfunction. The median levels of CSF quinolinic acid for Group 1 (232.5 nmol/l) were significantly higher than those for Group 2 (median 38.2 nmol/l) (p < 0.014). CSF and serum quinolinic acid levels correlated significantly (p < 0.003) but there was no correlation between CSF quinolinic acid and CSF protein concentrations or white blood cell counts. Conclusion. We conclude that elevated quinolinic acid levels in the CSF and serum may be associated with NPSLE and could possibly play a role in its pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-855
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume23
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Central Nervous System Lupus Vasculitis
Quinolinic Acid
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Serum
Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins
Leukocyte Count
Tryptophan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Vogelgesang, S. A., Heyes, M. P., West, S. G., Salazar, A. M., Sfikakis, P. P., Lipnick, R. N., ... Tsokos, G. C. (1996). Quinolinic acid in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Journal of Rheumatology, 23(5), 850-855.

Quinolinic acid in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric manifestations. / Vogelgesang, Scott A.; Heyes, Melvyn P.; West, Sterling G.; Salazar, Andres M.; Sfikakis, Peter P.; Lipnick, Robert N.; Klipple, Gary; Tsokos, George C.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.05.1996, p. 850-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vogelgesang, SA, Heyes, MP, West, SG, Salazar, AM, Sfikakis, PP, Lipnick, RN, Klipple, G & Tsokos, GC 1996, 'Quinolinic acid in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric manifestations', Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 850-855.
Vogelgesang SA, Heyes MP, West SG, Salazar AM, Sfikakis PP, Lipnick RN et al. Quinolinic acid in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Journal of Rheumatology. 1996 May 1;23(5):850-855.
Vogelgesang, Scott A. ; Heyes, Melvyn P. ; West, Sterling G. ; Salazar, Andres M. ; Sfikakis, Peter P. ; Lipnick, Robert N. ; Klipple, Gary ; Tsokos, George C. / Quinolinic acid in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neuropsychiatric manifestations. In: Journal of Rheumatology. 1996 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 850-855.
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