Race versus ethnic heritage in models of family economic decisions

Michael C. Thornton, Shelley White-Means

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Race is an important dimension which survey researchers use to examine a number of social phenomena. Despite its importance, few researchers realize the measurement implications of using race as a proxy for experience and culture in statistical modeling. Particularly problematic is the tendency to use race and ethnic heritage interchangeably. This article proposes that one cannot use race and ethnic heritage interchangeably without impacting the results and interpretation. Through a case study, measurement errors in models that use race and ethnic heritage interchangeably to examine family decisions are explored. Results using race are different from results when ethnic heritage is used. This article concludes with a proposed framework for research that contrasts the utility of race and ethnic heritage in statistical models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-86
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Family and Economic Issues
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Economic Models
Research Personnel
Proxy
Statistical Models
Heritage
Family economics
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Race versus ethnic heritage in models of family economic decisions. / Thornton, Michael C.; White-Means, Shelley.

In: Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 65-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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