Racial differences in the association between body mass index and serum IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3

Jay Fowke, Charles E. Matthews, Herbert Yu, Qiuyin Cai, Sarah Cohen, Maciej S. Buchowski, Wei Zheng, William J. Blot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

African-American (AA) race/ethnicity, lower body mass index (BMI), and higher IGF1 levels are associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk. This cross-sectional analysis investigated whether BMI or BMI at age 21 years contributes to racial differences in IGF1, IGF2, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), or free IGF1. Participants included 816 white and 821 AA women between ages 40 and 79 years across a wide BMI range (18.5-40 kg/m 2 ). Compared with white women, AA women had higher mean IGF1 (146.3 vs 134.4 ng/ml) and free IGF1 (0.145 vs 0.127) levels, and lower IGF2 (1633.0 vs 1769.3 ng/ml) and IGFBP3 (3663.3 vs 3842.5 ng/ml) levels (all P<0.01; adjusted for age, height, BMI, BMI at age 21 years, and menopausal status). Regardless of race, IGF1 and free IGF1 levels rose sharply as BMI increased to 22-24 kg/m 2 , and then declined thereafter, while IGF2 and IGFBP3 levels tended to rise with BMI. In contrast, BMI at age 21 years was inversely associated with all IGF levels, but only among white women (P-interaction=0.01). With the decline in IGF1 with BMI at age 21 years among whites, racial differences in IGF1 significantly increased among women who were obese in early adulthood. In summary, BMI was associated with IGF1 levels regardless of race/ethnicity, while obesity during childhood or young adulthood may have a greater impact on IGF1 levels among white women. The effects of obesity throughout life on the IGF axis and racial differences in breast cancer risk require study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-60
Number of pages10
JournalEndocrine-Related Cancer
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3
Body Mass Index
Serum
African Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Pediatric Obesity
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Oncology
  • Endocrinology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Racial differences in the association between body mass index and serum IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3. / Fowke, Jay; Matthews, Charles E.; Yu, Herbert; Cai, Qiuyin; Cohen, Sarah; Buchowski, Maciej S.; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William J.

In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 51-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fowke, J, Matthews, CE, Yu, H, Cai, Q, Cohen, S, Buchowski, MS, Zheng, W & Blot, WJ 2010, 'Racial differences in the association between body mass index and serum IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3', Endocrine-Related Cancer, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 51-60. https://doi.org/10.1677/ERC-09-0023
Fowke, Jay ; Matthews, Charles E. ; Yu, Herbert ; Cai, Qiuyin ; Cohen, Sarah ; Buchowski, Maciej S. ; Zheng, Wei ; Blot, William J. / Racial differences in the association between body mass index and serum IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP3. In: Endocrine-Related Cancer. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 51-60.
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