Radioembolization and the dynamic role of 90Y PET/CT

Alexander Pasciak, Austin Bourgeois, J. Mark McKinney, Ted T. Chang, Dustin Osborne, Shelley N. Acuff, Yong Bradley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Before the advent of tomographic imaging, it was postulated that decay of 90 Y to the 0+ excited state of 90Zr may result in emission of a positron-electron pair. While the branching ratio for pair-production is small (̃32 × 10-6), PET has been successfully used to image 90 Y in numerous recent patients and phantom studies. 90 Y PET imaging has been performed on a variety of PET/CT systems, with and without time-of-flight (TOF) and/or resolution recovery capabilities as well as on both bismuth-germanate and lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO)-based scanners. On all systems, resolution and contrast superior to bremsstrahlung SPECT has been reported. The intrinsic radioactivity present in LYSO-based PET scanners is a potential limitation associated with accurate quantification of 90 Y. However, intrinsic radioactivity has been shown to have a negligible effect at the high activity concentrations common in 90 Y radioembolization. Accurate quantification is possible on a variety of PET scanner models, with or without TOF, although TOF improves accuracy at lower activity concentrations. Quantitative 90 Y PET images can be transformed into 3-dimensional (3D) maps of absorbed dose based on the premise that the 90 Y activity distribution does not change after infusion. This transformation has been accomplished in several ways, although the most common is with the use of 3D dose-point-kernel convolution. From a clinical standpoint, 90 Y PET provides a superior post-infusion evaluation of treatment technical success owing to its improved resolution. Absorbed dose maps generated from quantitative PET data can be used to predict treatment efficacy and manage patient follow-up. For patients who receive multiple treatments, this information can also be used to provide patient-specific treatment-planning for successive therapies, potentially improving response. The broad utilization of 90 Y PET has the potential to provide a wealth of dose-response information, which may lead to development of improved radioembolization treatment-planning models in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 38
JournalFrontiers in Oncology
Volume4 MAR
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Radioactivity
Electrons
Therapeutics
Yttrium
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
bismuth germanium oxide
lutetium orthosilicate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Radioembolization and the dynamic role of 90Y PET/CT. / Pasciak, Alexander; Bourgeois, Austin; McKinney, J. Mark; Chang, Ted T.; Osborne, Dustin; Acuff, Shelley N.; Bradley, Yong.

In: Frontiers in Oncology, Vol. 4 MAR, Article 38, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pasciak, Alexander ; Bourgeois, Austin ; McKinney, J. Mark ; Chang, Ted T. ; Osborne, Dustin ; Acuff, Shelley N. ; Bradley, Yong. / Radioembolization and the dynamic role of 90Y PET/CT. In: Frontiers in Oncology. 2014 ; Vol. 4 MAR.
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