Rapid collection of biospecimens by automated identification of patients eligible for pharmacoepigenetic studies

Yan V. Sun, Robert Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epigenetics plays an important role in regulating gene expression, and can be modified by environmental factors and physiological conditions. Studying epigenetics is a promising approach to potentially improving the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of human diseases, and to providing personalized medical care. However, the role of epigenetics in the development of diseases is not clear because epigenetic markers may be both mediators and outcomes of human diseases. It is particularly complicated to study pharmacoepigenetics, as medication use may modify the epigenetic profile. To address the challenges facing pharmacoepigenetic research of human diseases, we developed a novel design to rapidly identify, contact, and recruit participants and collect specimens for longitudinal studies of pharmacoepigenetics. Using data in real-time from electronic medical record systems, we can identify patients recently start on new medications and who also have a blood test. Prior to disposal of the leftover blood by the clinical laboratory, we are able to contact and recruit these patients, enabling us to use both their leftover baseline blood sample as well as leftover specimens at future tests. With treatment-naïve and follow-up specimens, this system is able to study both epigenetic markers associated with disease without treatment effect as well as treatment-related epigenetic changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-274
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Epigenomics
Electronic Health Records
Hematologic Tests
Therapeutics
Longitudinal Studies
Gene Expression
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Rapid collection of biospecimens by automated identification of patients eligible for pharmacoepigenetic studies. / Sun, Yan V.; Davis, Robert.

In: Journal of Personalized Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.01.2013, p. 263-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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