Rapid decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate is common in adults with sickle cell disease and associated with increased mortality

Vimal K. Derebail, Qingning Zhou, Emily J. Ciccone, Jianwen Cai, Kenneth Ataga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We evaluated the prevalence of rapid decline in kidney function, its potential risk factors and influence upon mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD) in a retrospective single-center study. Rapid decline of kidney function was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) loss of >3·0 ml/min/1·73 m2 per year. A multivariable logistic regression model for rapid eGFR decline was constructed after evaluating individual covariates. We constructed multivariate Cox-regression models for rapid eGFR decline and mortality. Among 331 SCD patients (median age 29 years [interquartile range, IQR: 20, 41]; 187 [56·5%] female) followed for median 4·01 years (IQR: 1·66, 7·19), rapid eGFR decline was noted in 103 (31·1%). History of stroke (odds ratio [OR]: 2·91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1·25–6·77) and use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (OR: 3·17, 95% CI: 1·28–7·84) were associated with rapid eGFR decline. The rate of eGFR change over time was associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 0·99, 95% CI: 0·984–0·995, P = 0·0002). In Cox-regression, rapid eGFR decline associated with mortality (HR: 2·07, 95% CI: 1·039–4·138, P = 0·04) adjusting for age, sex and history of stroke. Rapid eGFR decline is common in SCD and associated with increased mortality. Long-term studies are needed to determine whether attenuating loss of kidney function may decrease mortality in SCD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)900-907
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume186
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Kidney
Logistic Models
Stroke
Odds Ratio
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Proportional Hazards Models
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology

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Rapid decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate is common in adults with sickle cell disease and associated with increased mortality. / Derebail, Vimal K.; Zhou, Qingning; Ciccone, Emily J.; Cai, Jianwen; Ataga, Kenneth.

In: British Journal of Haematology, Vol. 186, No. 6, 01.09.2019, p. 900-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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