Rapid disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junction and barrier dysfunction by ionizing radiation in mouse colon in vivo

Protection by N-acetyl-L-cysteine

Pradeep Kumar Shukla, Ruchika Gangwar, Bhargavi Manda, Avtar Meena, Nikki Yadav, Erzsebet Szabo, Andrea Balogh, Sue Lee, Gabor Tigyi, Radhakrishna Rao

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Abstract

The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2–24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascularto-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)G705-G715
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume310
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

Tight Junctions
Acetylcysteine
Ionizing Radiation
Adherens Junctions
Colon
Radiation
Actin Cytoskeleton
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Inulin
Proteins
Oxidative Stress
Claudin-3
Occludin
Catenins
Whole-Body Irradiation
Herpes Zoster
Cadherins
Fluorescein
Fluorescence Microscopy
Confocal Microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Rapid disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junction and barrier dysfunction by ionizing radiation in mouse colon in vivo: Protection by N-acetyl-L-cysteine",
abstract = "The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2–24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascularto-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding.",
author = "Shukla, {Pradeep Kumar} and Ruchika Gangwar and Bhargavi Manda and Avtar Meena and Nikki Yadav and Erzsebet Szabo and Andrea Balogh and Sue Lee and Gabor Tigyi and Radhakrishna Rao",
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T2 - Protection by N-acetyl-L-cysteine

AU - Shukla, Pradeep Kumar

AU - Gangwar, Ruchika

AU - Manda, Bhargavi

AU - Meena, Avtar

AU - Yadav, Nikki

AU - Szabo, Erzsebet

AU - Balogh, Andrea

AU - Lee, Sue

AU - Tigyi, Gabor

AU - Rao, Radhakrishna

PY - 2016/5/1

Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2–24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascularto-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding.

AB - The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on apical junctions in colonic epithelium and mucosal barrier function in mice in vivo. Adult mice were subjected to total body irradiation (4 Gy) with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) feeding for 5 days before irradiation. At 2–24 h postirradiation, the integrity of colonic epithelial tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and the actin cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of detergent-insoluble fractions for TJ and AJ proteins. The barrier function was evaluated by measuring vascularto-luminal flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin in vivo and luminal-to-mucosal flux in vitro. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein thiol oxidation. Confocal microscopy showed that radiation caused redistribution of occludin, zona occludens-1, claudin-3, E-cadherin, and β-catenin, as well as the actin cytoskeleton as early as 2 h postirradiation, and this effect was sustained for at least 24 h. Feeding NAC before irradiation blocked radiation-induced disruption of TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton. Radiation increased mucosal permeability to inulin in colon, which was blocked by NAC feeding. The level of reduced-protein thiols in colon was depleted by radiation with a concomitant increase in the level of oxidized-protein thiol. NAC feeding blocked the radiation-induced protein thiol oxidation. These data demonstrate that radiation rapidly disrupts TJ, AJ, and the actin cytoskeleton by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism that can be prevented by NAC feeding.

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