Rat strain differences in nicotine self-administration using an unlimited access paradigm

Victoria G. Brower, Yitong Fu, Shannon G. Matta, Burt Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An effective animal model for elucidating the neurobiological basis of human smoking should simulate important aspects of this behavior. Therefore, a 23 h unlimited access nicotine self-administration model was used to compare inbred Lewis rats, which have a propensity to self-administer drugs of abuse, to inbred Fisher 344 rats and to the outbared Holtzman strain. Using this unlimited access model, 88.8% of Lewis vs. 57.1% of Holtzman rats achieved maintenance self-administration at a fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) at 0.03 mg/kg IV nicotine (P<0.05). In contrast, Fisher rats did not acquire self-administration under these conditions. Of the Lewis and Holtzman rats that achieved maintenance self-administration on an FR 1 schedule, a greater percentage of Lewis rats acquired nicotine self-administration at FR 2 (P<0.05) and progressed to FR 4 (P<0.05). Using naïve cohorts in a progressive dose reduction study, 83.3% of Lewis rats achieved maintenance at 0.0075 mg/kg nicotine as compared to 31.8% of Holtzman rats (P<0.05). Furthermore, only Lewis rats showed differences in active vs. inactive bar presses during maintenance at sequential dose reductions (P<0.001). Thus, in this unlimited access model, inbred Lewis rats will more reliably acquire nicotine self-administration than outbred Holtzman rats. Moreover, Lewis rats showed a significantly higher likelihood of continuing to self-administer nicotine in face of both increasing work requirements and decreasing drug reinforcement. Therefore, it is likely that Lewis rats would be genetically susceptible to nicotine addiction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-20
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Research
Volume930
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2002

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Self Administration
Nicotine
Sprague Dawley Rats
Inbred Lew Rats
Maintenance
Inbred F344 Rats
Street Drugs
Appointments and Schedules
Animal Models
Smoking
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Rat strain differences in nicotine self-administration using an unlimited access paradigm. / Brower, Victoria G.; Fu, Yitong; Matta, Shannon G.; Sharp, Burt.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 930, No. 1-2, 15.03.2002, p. 12-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brower, Victoria G. ; Fu, Yitong ; Matta, Shannon G. ; Sharp, Burt. / Rat strain differences in nicotine self-administration using an unlimited access paradigm. In: Brain Research. 2002 ; Vol. 930, No. 1-2. pp. 12-20.
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