Reactive oxygen species promote angiogenesis in the infarcted rat heart

Wenyuan Zhao, Tieqiang Zhao, Yuanjian Chen, Robert A. Ahokas, Yao Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote cardiac angiogenesis following myocardial infarction (MI) and contribute to cardiac repair. Rats with MI were treated with or without antioxidants, tempol and apocynin. Hearts of these rats were collected at days 2, 4, 7 and 14 post-MI. We examined the spatial and temporal relationship between oxidative stress and angiogenesis as well as the potential regulation of ROS in cardiac angiogenesis. We found: (i) following MI, gp91phox, a subunit of NADPH oxidase, a key enzyme for ROS production, was significantly increased in the border zone at day 2, followed by the infarcted myocardium at day 4, peaked at day 7 and declined at day 14, while superoxide dismutase was significantly reduced; (ii) malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress, was significantly increased in the infarcted myocardium at day 7; (iii) pre-existing blood vessels in the infarcted myocardium underwent necrosis post-MI, whereas newly formed vessels appeared at the border zone at day 4, and then extended into the infarcted myocardium, where microvascular density peaked at day 7 and (iv) antioxidant treatment significantly reduced microvascular density in the infarcted myocardium at day 7. These observations suggest that following MI, angiogenesis is mostly active in the infarcted myocardium in the first week, which is temporally and spatially coincident with enhanced ROS. Suppression of angiogenesis by antioxidants indicates that ROS promote angiogenesis in the infarcted myocardium and contribute to cardiac repair. Further studies are required to determine the mechanisms responsible for ROS-mediated cardiac angiogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)621-629
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Experimental Pathology
Volume90
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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Reactive Oxygen Species
Myocardium
Myocardial Infarction
Antioxidants
Oxidative Stress
NADPH Oxidase
Malondialdehyde
Superoxide Dismutase
Blood Vessels
Necrosis
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Reactive oxygen species promote angiogenesis in the infarcted rat heart. / Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Chen, Yuanjian; Ahokas, Robert A.; Sun, Yao.

In: International Journal of Experimental Pathology, Vol. 90, No. 6, 01.12.2009, p. 621-629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhao, Wenyuan ; Zhao, Tieqiang ; Chen, Yuanjian ; Ahokas, Robert A. ; Sun, Yao. / Reactive oxygen species promote angiogenesis in the infarcted rat heart. In: International Journal of Experimental Pathology. 2009 ; Vol. 90, No. 6. pp. 621-629.
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