Recent advances in alcoholic liver disease. I. Role of intestinal permeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic liver disease

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230 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant body of evidence indicates that endotoxemia and endotoxin-mediated hepatocellular damage play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. A close correlation between endotoxemia and the severity of alcohol-induced liver injury is supported by a number of clinical and experimental studies. Elevated intestinal permeability appears to be the major factor involved in the mechanism of alcoholic endotoxemia and the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol and its metabolic derivatives, acetaldehyde in particular, alter intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to the disruption of epithelial tight junctions and an increase in paracellular permeability to macromolecules. Studies addressing the mechanisms of such epithelial disruption and the protective factors that prevent ethanol and acetaldehyde-mediated disruption of epithelial tight junctions are critically important in the investigations toward the search of preventive and therapeutic strategies for alcoholic liver disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume286
Issue number6 49-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

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Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Endotoxemia
Permeability
Acetaldehyde
Tight Junctions
Ethanol
Endotoxins
Signal Transduction
Alcohols
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

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title = "Recent advances in alcoholic liver disease. I. Role of intestinal permeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic liver disease",
abstract = "A significant body of evidence indicates that endotoxemia and endotoxin-mediated hepatocellular damage play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. A close correlation between endotoxemia and the severity of alcohol-induced liver injury is supported by a number of clinical and experimental studies. Elevated intestinal permeability appears to be the major factor involved in the mechanism of alcoholic endotoxemia and the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol and its metabolic derivatives, acetaldehyde in particular, alter intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to the disruption of epithelial tight junctions and an increase in paracellular permeability to macromolecules. Studies addressing the mechanisms of such epithelial disruption and the protective factors that prevent ethanol and acetaldehyde-mediated disruption of epithelial tight junctions are critically important in the investigations toward the search of preventive and therapeutic strategies for alcoholic liver disease.",
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AU - Seth, Ankur

AU - Sheth, P.

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N2 - A significant body of evidence indicates that endotoxemia and endotoxin-mediated hepatocellular damage play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. A close correlation between endotoxemia and the severity of alcohol-induced liver injury is supported by a number of clinical and experimental studies. Elevated intestinal permeability appears to be the major factor involved in the mechanism of alcoholic endotoxemia and the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol and its metabolic derivatives, acetaldehyde in particular, alter intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to the disruption of epithelial tight junctions and an increase in paracellular permeability to macromolecules. Studies addressing the mechanisms of such epithelial disruption and the protective factors that prevent ethanol and acetaldehyde-mediated disruption of epithelial tight junctions are critically important in the investigations toward the search of preventive and therapeutic strategies for alcoholic liver disease.

AB - A significant body of evidence indicates that endotoxemia and endotoxin-mediated hepatocellular damage play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. A close correlation between endotoxemia and the severity of alcohol-induced liver injury is supported by a number of clinical and experimental studies. Elevated intestinal permeability appears to be the major factor involved in the mechanism of alcoholic endotoxemia and the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol and its metabolic derivatives, acetaldehyde in particular, alter intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to the disruption of epithelial tight junctions and an increase in paracellular permeability to macromolecules. Studies addressing the mechanisms of such epithelial disruption and the protective factors that prevent ethanol and acetaldehyde-mediated disruption of epithelial tight junctions are critically important in the investigations toward the search of preventive and therapeutic strategies for alcoholic liver disease.

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