Recent advances in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

A post-MASCC 2009 discussion

Gary R. Morrow, Susan G. Urba, Lee Schwartzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common but debilitating side effect of anticancer therapy. Acute, delayed, and anticipatory CINV can require different approaches, and there have been advances in the prevention of acute CINV in recent years. 5-HT3 and NK-1 receptor antagonists are effective in the prevention of nausea and emesis. Corticosteroids, dopamine receptor antagonists, and cannabinoids have also been introduced in this setting. Clinical guidelines for the management of CINV have been promulgated by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. The etiology of CINV and risk classifications; various treatment approaches, including their mechanisms of action, efficacy findings, and safety issues; and the treatment guidelines are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalClinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology
Volume7
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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Nausea
Vomiting
Drug Therapy
Guidelines
Neurokinin-1 Receptors
Dopamine Antagonists
Cannabinoids
Steroid Receptors
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Recent advances in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting : A post-MASCC 2009 discussion. / Morrow, Gary R.; Urba, Susan G.; Schwartzberg, Lee.

In: Clinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology, Vol. 7, No. 12, 01.12.2009, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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