Recent efforts to model human diseases in vivo in Drosophila

Cathie M. Pfleger, Lawrence Reiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Upon completion of sequencing the Drosophila genome, it was estimated that 61% of human disease-associated genes had sequence homologs in flies, and in some diseases such as cancer, the number was as high as 68%.1 We now know that as many as 75% of the genes associated with genetic disease have counterparts in Drosophila.2 Using better tools for mutation detection, association studies and whole genome analysis the number of human genes associated with genetic disease is steadily increasing. These detection efforts are outpacing the ability to assign function and understand the underlying cause of the disease at the molecular level. Drosophila models can therefore advance human disease research in a number of ways by: establishing the normal role of these gene products during development, elucidating the mechanism underlying disease pathology, and even identifying candidate therapeutic agents for the treatment of human disease. At the 49th Annual Drosophila Research Conference in San Diego this year, a number of labs presented their exciting findings on Drosophila models of human disease in both platform presentations and poster sessions. Here we can only briefly review some of these developments, and we apologize that we do not have the time or space to review all of the findings presented which use Drosophila to understand human disease etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-132
Number of pages4
JournalFly
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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human diseases
Drosophila
genetic disorders
genome
genes
product development
etiology
mutation
nucleotide sequences
therapeutics
neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Recent efforts to model human diseases in vivo in Drosophila. / Pfleger, Cathie M.; Reiter, Lawrence.

In: Fly, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.01.2008, p. 129-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pfleger, Cathie M. ; Reiter, Lawrence. / Recent efforts to model human diseases in vivo in Drosophila. In: Fly. 2008 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 129-132.
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