Receptor for advanced glycation end products, inflammation, and accelerated periodontal disease in diabetes

mechanisms and insights into therapeutic modalities.

E. Lalla, I. B. Lamster, David Stern, A. M. Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In hyperglycemic states found in diabetics, a nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins and lipids occurs. As a result, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), particularly N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine, accumulate in the plasma and tissues of diabetic subjects. This accumulation has been linked to the development of pathogenic complications of diabetes. Many of the effects of AGEs are receptor-dependent and involve a multi-ligand member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules. The best characterized of these is the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which is expressed by multiple cell types including endothelium and mononuclear phagocytes. Based on data from a variety of sources, including studies of RAGE-deficient mice, it appears that RAGE plays a central role in oral infection, exaggerated inflammatory host responses, and destruction of alveolar bone in diabetes. It is possible that antagonists of RAGE might have a valuable adjunctive therapeutic role for the management of periodontal disease found in diabetics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-118
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of periodontology / the American Academy of Periodontology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Periodontal Diseases
Inflammation
Advanced Glycosylation End Products
Diabetes Complications
Therapeutics
Phagocytes
Endothelium
Immunoglobulins
Ligands
Lipids
Bone and Bones
Advanced Glycosylation End Product-Specific Receptor
Infection
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "In hyperglycemic states found in diabetics, a nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins and lipids occurs. As a result, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), particularly N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine, accumulate in the plasma and tissues of diabetic subjects. This accumulation has been linked to the development of pathogenic complications of diabetes. Many of the effects of AGEs are receptor-dependent and involve a multi-ligand member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules. The best characterized of these is the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which is expressed by multiple cell types including endothelium and mononuclear phagocytes. Based on data from a variety of sources, including studies of RAGE-deficient mice, it appears that RAGE plays a central role in oral infection, exaggerated inflammatory host responses, and destruction of alveolar bone in diabetes. It is possible that antagonists of RAGE might have a valuable adjunctive therapeutic role for the management of periodontal disease found in diabetics.",
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AU - Lamster, I. B.

AU - Stern, David

AU - Schmidt, A. M.

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