Rechallenge With Crystalline Niacin After Drug-Induced Hepatitis From Sustained-Release Niacin

Yaakov Henkin, Karen Johnson, Jere P. Segrest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Niacin (nicotinic acid) is available in several forms, including crystalline preparations and various types of sustained-release preparations. Evidence exists that sustained-release niacin, with respect to both dosage and severity, is more hepatotoxic than crystalline niacin. Three patients who developed hepatitis during treatment with sustained-release niacin were rechallenged with equivalent or higher doses of crystalline niacin, with no evidence of recurring hepatocellular damage. Although the mechanism for niacin-induced hepatitis is unknown, these cases support previous observations that crystalline niacin may be less hepatotoxic than sustained-release preparations in certain patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-243
Number of pages3
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume264
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 1990

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Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury
Niacin
Delayed-Action Preparations
Hepatitis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rechallenge With Crystalline Niacin After Drug-Induced Hepatitis From Sustained-Release Niacin. / Henkin, Yaakov; Johnson, Karen; Segrest, Jere P.

In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 264, No. 2, 11.07.1990, p. 241-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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