Recidivism in liver transplant recipients with alcoholic liver disease

Analysis of demographic, psychosocial, and histology features

Sanjaya Satapathy, James D. Eason, Satheesh Nair, Oleksandra Dryn, Pamela B. Sylvestre, Mehmet Kocak, Jason M. Vanatta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Liver transplant for alcoholic liver disease requires identifying potential recipients at risk for recidivism. We sought to identify risk factors for recidivism and survival in recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Materials and Methods: Demographic, psychosocial, and histology features were evaluated as risk factors toward harmful recidivism in 148 recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Results: Based on the univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model, duration of alcohol abstinence 6 ≤ months (HR 3.74; P = .011, 95% CI: 1.36-10.3), non-alcohol related criminal history (HR 3.18; P = .032, 95% CI: 1.1-9.15), support from immediate family (HR 0.24; P = .0061, 95% CI: 0.09-0.67), and active smoking at the time of liver transplant (HR 2.74; P = .041, 95% CI: 1-7.53) were identified as significant predictors for recidivism. Older patients had less likelihood of alcohol relapse (HR 0.91; P = .0014, 95% CI: 0.87-0.97) on univariate model. In multivariate model older patients (HR 0.91; P = .004, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97) and patients who have immediate family support (HR 0.27; P = .012, 95% CI: 0.10-0.76) predicated against recidivism. Suggestive features of alcoholic hepatitis on liver explant did not predict recidivism or long-term survival. One-, three-, and five-year patient survival rates estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival model in the recipients that remained abstinent were 95%, 87%, and 80%, compared with 87%, 49%, and 49% for the recipients with recidivism (P = .001). Conclusions: Recidivism is associated with earlier death after liver transplant. Older recipients and patients with immediate family support are less likely to have alcohol relapse, and have better longterm survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)430-440
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental and Clinical Transplantation
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Histology
Demography
Liver
Survival
Transplants
Alcohols
Alcohol Abstinence
Alcoholic Hepatitis
Recurrence
Proportional Hazards Models
Transplant Recipients
Survival Rate
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Recidivism in liver transplant recipients with alcoholic liver disease : Analysis of demographic, psychosocial, and histology features. / Satapathy, Sanjaya; Eason, James D.; Nair, Satheesh; Dryn, Oleksandra; Sylvestre, Pamela B.; Kocak, Mehmet; Vanatta, Jason M.

In: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.10.2015, p. 430-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satapathy, Sanjaya ; Eason, James D. ; Nair, Satheesh ; Dryn, Oleksandra ; Sylvestre, Pamela B. ; Kocak, Mehmet ; Vanatta, Jason M. / Recidivism in liver transplant recipients with alcoholic liver disease : Analysis of demographic, psychosocial, and histology features. In: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 430-440.
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abstract = "Objectives: Liver transplant for alcoholic liver disease requires identifying potential recipients at risk for recidivism. We sought to identify risk factors for recidivism and survival in recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Materials and Methods: Demographic, psychosocial, and histology features were evaluated as risk factors toward harmful recidivism in 148 recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Results: Based on the univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model, duration of alcohol abstinence 6 ≤ months (HR 3.74; P = .011, 95{\%} CI: 1.36-10.3), non-alcohol related criminal history (HR 3.18; P = .032, 95{\%} CI: 1.1-9.15), support from immediate family (HR 0.24; P = .0061, 95{\%} CI: 0.09-0.67), and active smoking at the time of liver transplant (HR 2.74; P = .041, 95{\%} CI: 1-7.53) were identified as significant predictors for recidivism. Older patients had less likelihood of alcohol relapse (HR 0.91; P = .0014, 95{\%} CI: 0.87-0.97) on univariate model. In multivariate model older patients (HR 0.91; P = .004, 95{\%} CI: 0.86-0.97) and patients who have immediate family support (HR 0.27; P = .012, 95{\%} CI: 0.10-0.76) predicated against recidivism. Suggestive features of alcoholic hepatitis on liver explant did not predict recidivism or long-term survival. One-, three-, and five-year patient survival rates estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival model in the recipients that remained abstinent were 95{\%}, 87{\%}, and 80{\%}, compared with 87{\%}, 49{\%}, and 49{\%} for the recipients with recidivism (P = .001). Conclusions: Recidivism is associated with earlier death after liver transplant. Older recipients and patients with immediate family support are less likely to have alcohol relapse, and have better longterm survival.",
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AU - Satapathy, Sanjaya

AU - Eason, James D.

AU - Nair, Satheesh

AU - Dryn, Oleksandra

AU - Sylvestre, Pamela B.

AU - Kocak, Mehmet

AU - Vanatta, Jason M.

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N2 - Objectives: Liver transplant for alcoholic liver disease requires identifying potential recipients at risk for recidivism. We sought to identify risk factors for recidivism and survival in recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Materials and Methods: Demographic, psychosocial, and histology features were evaluated as risk factors toward harmful recidivism in 148 recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Results: Based on the univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model, duration of alcohol abstinence 6 ≤ months (HR 3.74; P = .011, 95% CI: 1.36-10.3), non-alcohol related criminal history (HR 3.18; P = .032, 95% CI: 1.1-9.15), support from immediate family (HR 0.24; P = .0061, 95% CI: 0.09-0.67), and active smoking at the time of liver transplant (HR 2.74; P = .041, 95% CI: 1-7.53) were identified as significant predictors for recidivism. Older patients had less likelihood of alcohol relapse (HR 0.91; P = .0014, 95% CI: 0.87-0.97) on univariate model. In multivariate model older patients (HR 0.91; P = .004, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97) and patients who have immediate family support (HR 0.27; P = .012, 95% CI: 0.10-0.76) predicated against recidivism. Suggestive features of alcoholic hepatitis on liver explant did not predict recidivism or long-term survival. One-, three-, and five-year patient survival rates estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival model in the recipients that remained abstinent were 95%, 87%, and 80%, compared with 87%, 49%, and 49% for the recipients with recidivism (P = .001). Conclusions: Recidivism is associated with earlier death after liver transplant. Older recipients and patients with immediate family support are less likely to have alcohol relapse, and have better longterm survival.

AB - Objectives: Liver transplant for alcoholic liver disease requires identifying potential recipients at risk for recidivism. We sought to identify risk factors for recidivism and survival in recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Materials and Methods: Demographic, psychosocial, and histology features were evaluated as risk factors toward harmful recidivism in 148 recipients of liver transplant with alcoholic liver disease. Results: Based on the univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model, duration of alcohol abstinence 6 ≤ months (HR 3.74; P = .011, 95% CI: 1.36-10.3), non-alcohol related criminal history (HR 3.18; P = .032, 95% CI: 1.1-9.15), support from immediate family (HR 0.24; P = .0061, 95% CI: 0.09-0.67), and active smoking at the time of liver transplant (HR 2.74; P = .041, 95% CI: 1-7.53) were identified as significant predictors for recidivism. Older patients had less likelihood of alcohol relapse (HR 0.91; P = .0014, 95% CI: 0.87-0.97) on univariate model. In multivariate model older patients (HR 0.91; P = .004, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97) and patients who have immediate family support (HR 0.27; P = .012, 95% CI: 0.10-0.76) predicated against recidivism. Suggestive features of alcoholic hepatitis on liver explant did not predict recidivism or long-term survival. One-, three-, and five-year patient survival rates estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival model in the recipients that remained abstinent were 95%, 87%, and 80%, compared with 87%, 49%, and 49% for the recipients with recidivism (P = .001). Conclusions: Recidivism is associated with earlier death after liver transplant. Older recipients and patients with immediate family support are less likely to have alcohol relapse, and have better longterm survival.

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