Recurrent craniopharyngioma after conformal radiation in children and the burden of treatment

Paul Klimo, Garrett T. Venable, Frederick Boop, Thomas E. Merchant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object: In this paper the authors present their experience treating children with recurrent craniopharyngioma who were initially managed with surgery followed by conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods: A departmental oncology information system was queried to identify all children (<18 years old) who received CRT for a craniopharyngioma between 1998 and 2010 (inclusive) and specifically those who experienced tumor progression. For each patient, the authors recorded the type of recurrence (solid, cystic, or both), the time interval to first progression and each subsequent progression, the associated treatment complications, and disease status at last follow-up evaluation. Results: Among the 97 patients that met criteria for entry into this study, 18 (18.6%) experienced tumor progression (9 cystic, 3 solid, 6 cystic and solid). The median time to first recurrence was 4.62 years (range 1.81-9.11 years). The subgroup included 6 female and 12 male patients with a median age of 7.54 years (range 3.61-13.83 years). Ten patients experienced first progression within 5 years of CRT. The 5- and 10-year treatment-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 89.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80.5%-93.9%) and 76.2% (95% CI 64%-85%), respectively. Seven patients had a single episode of progression and 11 had more than 1. The time interval between each subsequent progression was progressively shorter. The 18 patients underwent 38 procedures. The median follow-up duration for this group was 9.32 years (range 4.04-19.0 years). Three patients died, including 1 from perioperative complications. Conclusions: Craniopharyngioma progression after prior irradiation is exceedingly difficult to treat and local control is challenging despite repeated surgical procedures. Given our results, gross-total resection may need to be the surgical goal at the time of first recurrence, if possible. Decompressing new cyst formation alone has a low rate of long-term success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-505
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

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Craniopharyngioma
Radiation
Radiotherapy
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Confidence Intervals
Information Systems
Cysts
Neoplasms
Survival Rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Recurrent craniopharyngioma after conformal radiation in children and the burden of treatment. / Klimo, Paul; Venable, Garrett T.; Boop, Frederick; Merchant, Thomas E.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Vol. 15, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 499-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Object: In this paper the authors present their experience treating children with recurrent craniopharyngioma who were initially managed with surgery followed by conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods: A departmental oncology information system was queried to identify all children (<18 years old) who received CRT for a craniopharyngioma between 1998 and 2010 (inclusive) and specifically those who experienced tumor progression. For each patient, the authors recorded the type of recurrence (solid, cystic, or both), the time interval to first progression and each subsequent progression, the associated treatment complications, and disease status at last follow-up evaluation. Results: Among the 97 patients that met criteria for entry into this study, 18 (18.6{\%}) experienced tumor progression (9 cystic, 3 solid, 6 cystic and solid). The median time to first recurrence was 4.62 years (range 1.81-9.11 years). The subgroup included 6 female and 12 male patients with a median age of 7.54 years (range 3.61-13.83 years). Ten patients experienced first progression within 5 years of CRT. The 5- and 10-year treatment-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 89.0{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 80.5{\%}-93.9{\%}) and 76.2{\%} (95{\%} CI 64{\%}-85{\%}), respectively. Seven patients had a single episode of progression and 11 had more than 1. The time interval between each subsequent progression was progressively shorter. The 18 patients underwent 38 procedures. The median follow-up duration for this group was 9.32 years (range 4.04-19.0 years). Three patients died, including 1 from perioperative complications. Conclusions: Craniopharyngioma progression after prior irradiation is exceedingly difficult to treat and local control is challenging despite repeated surgical procedures. Given our results, gross-total resection may need to be the surgical goal at the time of first recurrence, if possible. Decompressing new cyst formation alone has a low rate of long-term success.",
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