Recurrent hepatitis c virus infection and outcome after living-donor liver transplant

Sanjaya Satapathy, Maria Isabel Fiel, Jason M. Vanatta, Juan Del Rio Martin, Thomas D. Schiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: In living-donor liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C virus infection, outcomes of recurrent hepatitis C virus infection and fibrosis progression are not well documented. We evaluated fibrosis progression, response to pegylated interferon treatment, and long-term graft survival in living-donor liver transplant recipients who had hepatitis C virus infection. Materials and Methods: In 48 transplant recipients, including 29 recipients who had follow-up liver biopsy ≥ 6 months after transplant, histology and clinical courses were reviewed. Outcomes were evaluated for patients grouped into slow and rapid fibrosis groups. Treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin was assessed in 18 patients. Results: Clinical features were similar between recipients with slow or rapid fibrosis. The time interval from transplant to recurrence of hepatitis C virus infection was significantly shorter in the recipients with rapid fibrosis. Recipients with rapid fibrosis had significantly greater confluent necrosis, acidophil bodies, and fibrosis score than recipients with slow fibrosis. Graft survival rates were similar between patients with slow or rapid fibrosis. Cumulative proportion of long-term graft survival was 60% at 7 years after transplant. Sustained virologic response was noted in 5 of 18 patients (28%) who received pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Conclusions: In recipients of living-donor liver transplant with early recurrence of hepatitis C have worse fibrosis progression but graft survival was not affected. Therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin achieved sustained virologic response only in a small proportion of the patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-529
Number of pages8
JournalExperimental and Clinical Transplantation
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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Hepatitis Viruses
Living Donors
Virus Diseases
Fibrosis
Transplants
Liver
Graft Survival
Hepacivirus
Interferons
Ribavirin
Recurrence
Hepatitis C
Histology
Necrosis
Therapeutics
Survival Rate
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

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Recurrent hepatitis c virus infection and outcome after living-donor liver transplant. / Satapathy, Sanjaya; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Vanatta, Jason M.; Martin, Juan Del Rio; Schiano, Thomas D.

In: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 11, No. 6, 01.12.2013, p. 522-529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satapathy, Sanjaya ; Fiel, Maria Isabel ; Vanatta, Jason M. ; Martin, Juan Del Rio ; Schiano, Thomas D. / Recurrent hepatitis c virus infection and outcome after living-donor liver transplant. In: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation. 2013 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 522-529.
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