Recurrent ocular herpes simplex keratitis following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in a rabbit model

S. P. Epstein, E. M. Fisher, G. J. Sternberg, W. Franklin, R. Gordon, J. J. Ho, Penny Asbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) by excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) has been reported previously in the literature. This study evaluates the extent of such HSV reactivation and determines whether corneal de-epithelialization prior to PRK or the laser treatment itself induces this response. Methods: Twenty three normal 1.5-2.5 kg New Zealand white rabbits were infected on the surface of the cornea with HSV-1, strain RE. The animals were monitored until resolution and then divided into two treatment groups: 1) de-epithelialization alone, and 2) de-epithelialization plus laser. Animals were evaluated in a masked fashion by clinical examination and viral cultures twice a week through day 28. Results: The reactivation rate for group 1 (de-epithelization alone) was 0.0%, and for group 2 (PRK) was 67% by slit lamp biomicroscopy. Viral culture positivity rate matched these findings. Conclusions: Excimer laser (193 nm) treatment can trigger viral shedding and reactivation of herpetic ocular disease in the latently infected rabbit. De-epithelialization alone is not sufficient to cause such viral reactivation or keratitis. Our findings suggest that patients with a history of herpetic keratitis undergoing PRK are at increased risk of HSV reactivation as a result of exposure to the excimer laser.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-99
Number of pages6
JournalCLAO Journal
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 21 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Laser Corneal Surgery
Herpetic Keratitis
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Excimer Lasers
Simplexvirus
Rabbits
Lasers
Virus Shedding
Eye Diseases
Keratitis
Human Herpesvirus 1
Cornea
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Epstein, S. P., Fisher, E. M., Sternberg, G. J., Franklin, W., Gordon, R., Ho, J. J., & Asbell, P. (2001). Recurrent ocular herpes simplex keratitis following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in a rabbit model. CLAO Journal, 27(2), 94-99.

Recurrent ocular herpes simplex keratitis following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in a rabbit model. / Epstein, S. P.; Fisher, E. M.; Sternberg, G. J.; Franklin, W.; Gordon, R.; Ho, J. J.; Asbell, Penny.

In: CLAO Journal, Vol. 27, No. 2, 21.05.2001, p. 94-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Epstein, SP, Fisher, EM, Sternberg, GJ, Franklin, W, Gordon, R, Ho, JJ & Asbell, P 2001, 'Recurrent ocular herpes simplex keratitis following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in a rabbit model', CLAO Journal, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 94-99.
Epstein SP, Fisher EM, Sternberg GJ, Franklin W, Gordon R, Ho JJ et al. Recurrent ocular herpes simplex keratitis following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in a rabbit model. CLAO Journal. 2001 May 21;27(2):94-99.
Epstein, S. P. ; Fisher, E. M. ; Sternberg, G. J. ; Franklin, W. ; Gordon, R. ; Ho, J. J. ; Asbell, Penny. / Recurrent ocular herpes simplex keratitis following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in a rabbit model. In: CLAO Journal. 2001 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 94-99.
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