Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia

Atsushi Nambu, Satomi Chiken, Pullanipally Shashidharan, Hiroki Nishibayashi, Mitsuhiro Ogura, Koji Kakishita, Satoshi Tanaka, Yoshihisa Tachibana, Hitoshi Kita, Toru Itakura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by sustained or repetitive involuntary muscle contractions and abnormal postures. In the present article, we will introduce our recent electrophysiological studies in hyperkinetic transgenic mice generated as a model of DYT1 dystonia and in a human cervical dystonia patient, and discuss the pathophysiology of dystonia on the basis of these electrophysiological findings. Recording of neuronal activity in the awake state of DYT1 dystonia model mice revealed reduced spontaneous activity with bursts and pauses in both internal (GPi) and external (GPe) segments of the globus pallidus. Electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex evoked responses composed of excitation and subsequent long-lasting inhibition, the latter of which was never observed in normal mice. In addition, somatotopic arrangements were disorganized in the GPi and GPe of dystonia model mice. In a human cervical dystonia patient, electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex evoked similar long-lasting inhibition in the GPi and GPe. Thus, reduced GPi output may cause increased thalamic and cortical activity, resulting in the involuntary movements observed in dystonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number89
JournalFrontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Issue numberNOVEMBER 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2011

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Dystonia
Torticollis
Motor Cortex
Electric Stimulation
Globus Pallidus
Dyskinesias
Muscle Contraction
Nervous System Diseases
Posture
Transgenic Mice
Smooth Muscle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Nambu, A., Chiken, S., Shashidharan, P., Nishibayashi, H., Ogura, M., Kakishita, K., ... Itakura, T. (2011). Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, (NOVEMBER 2011), [89]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2011.00089

Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia. / Nambu, Atsushi; Chiken, Satomi; Shashidharan, Pullanipally; Nishibayashi, Hiroki; Ogura, Mitsuhiro; Kakishita, Koji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tachibana, Yoshihisa; Kita, Hitoshi; Itakura, Toru.

In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, No. NOVEMBER 2011, 89, 28.11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nambu, A, Chiken, S, Shashidharan, P, Nishibayashi, H, Ogura, M, Kakishita, K, Tanaka, S, Tachibana, Y, Kita, H & Itakura, T 2011, 'Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia', Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, no. NOVEMBER 2011, 89. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2011.00089
Nambu A, Chiken S, Shashidharan P, Nishibayashi H, Ogura M, Kakishita K et al. Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2011 Nov 28;(NOVEMBER 2011). 89. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2011.00089
Nambu, Atsushi ; Chiken, Satomi ; Shashidharan, Pullanipally ; Nishibayashi, Hiroki ; Ogura, Mitsuhiro ; Kakishita, Koji ; Tanaka, Satoshi ; Tachibana, Yoshihisa ; Kita, Hitoshi ; Itakura, Toru. / Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia. In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2011 ; No. NOVEMBER 2011.
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