Reducing emergency department visits and hospitalizations in African American and hispanic patients with asthma

A 15-year review

Timothy Self, Cary R. Chrisman, Darius L. Mason, Mark J. Rumbak

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Minority populations in the United States continue to experience a disproportionate share of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations due to asthma. This review examines programs that have attempted to reduce these acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients. We performed a PubMed search of the English literature for studies published from March 1990 to March 2005, aimed at reducing ED visits and hospitalizations in patients with asthma. Decreased acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients with asthma have been demonstrated in several studies over the past 15 years, including collaboration by physicians, nurses, and clinical pharmacists in achieving this goal. These studies have shown that reduced acute care visits are associated with optimal drug therapy per national guidelines, concurrent with patient education, environmental control, and objective monitoring of this inflammatory airway disease. Early intensive patient education was a key feature of these successful programs. Written action plans, including early use of oral corticosteroids at home, and rapport with patients are other key components of programs that have resulted in a decrease in ED visits and hospitalizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-812
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Asthma
Patient Education
Literature
Pharmacists
PubMed
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Nurses
Guidelines
Physicians
Drug Therapy
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Reducing emergency department visits and hospitalizations in African American and hispanic patients with asthma : A 15-year review. / Self, Timothy; Chrisman, Cary R.; Mason, Darius L.; Rumbak, Mark J.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 42, No. 10, 01.12.2005, p. 807-812.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Self, Timothy ; Chrisman, Cary R. ; Mason, Darius L. ; Rumbak, Mark J. / Reducing emergency department visits and hospitalizations in African American and hispanic patients with asthma : A 15-year review. In: Journal of Asthma. 2005 ; Vol. 42, No. 10. pp. 807-812.
@article{2bbc6c3bd5ac473295548b27cc882b53,
title = "Reducing emergency department visits and hospitalizations in African American and hispanic patients with asthma: A 15-year review",
abstract = "Minority populations in the United States continue to experience a disproportionate share of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations due to asthma. This review examines programs that have attempted to reduce these acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients. We performed a PubMed search of the English literature for studies published from March 1990 to March 2005, aimed at reducing ED visits and hospitalizations in patients with asthma. Decreased acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients with asthma have been demonstrated in several studies over the past 15 years, including collaboration by physicians, nurses, and clinical pharmacists in achieving this goal. These studies have shown that reduced acute care visits are associated with optimal drug therapy per national guidelines, concurrent with patient education, environmental control, and objective monitoring of this inflammatory airway disease. Early intensive patient education was a key feature of these successful programs. Written action plans, including early use of oral corticosteroids at home, and rapport with patients are other key components of programs that have resulted in a decrease in ED visits and hospitalizations.",
author = "Timothy Self and Chrisman, {Cary R.} and Mason, {Darius L.} and Rumbak, {Mark J.}",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02770900500369835",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "807--812",
journal = "Journal of Asthma",
issn = "0277-0903",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reducing emergency department visits and hospitalizations in African American and hispanic patients with asthma

T2 - A 15-year review

AU - Self, Timothy

AU - Chrisman, Cary R.

AU - Mason, Darius L.

AU - Rumbak, Mark J.

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - Minority populations in the United States continue to experience a disproportionate share of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations due to asthma. This review examines programs that have attempted to reduce these acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients. We performed a PubMed search of the English literature for studies published from March 1990 to March 2005, aimed at reducing ED visits and hospitalizations in patients with asthma. Decreased acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients with asthma have been demonstrated in several studies over the past 15 years, including collaboration by physicians, nurses, and clinical pharmacists in achieving this goal. These studies have shown that reduced acute care visits are associated with optimal drug therapy per national guidelines, concurrent with patient education, environmental control, and objective monitoring of this inflammatory airway disease. Early intensive patient education was a key feature of these successful programs. Written action plans, including early use of oral corticosteroids at home, and rapport with patients are other key components of programs that have resulted in a decrease in ED visits and hospitalizations.

AB - Minority populations in the United States continue to experience a disproportionate share of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations due to asthma. This review examines programs that have attempted to reduce these acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients. We performed a PubMed search of the English literature for studies published from March 1990 to March 2005, aimed at reducing ED visits and hospitalizations in patients with asthma. Decreased acute care visits in African American and Hispanic patients with asthma have been demonstrated in several studies over the past 15 years, including collaboration by physicians, nurses, and clinical pharmacists in achieving this goal. These studies have shown that reduced acute care visits are associated with optimal drug therapy per national guidelines, concurrent with patient education, environmental control, and objective monitoring of this inflammatory airway disease. Early intensive patient education was a key feature of these successful programs. Written action plans, including early use of oral corticosteroids at home, and rapport with patients are other key components of programs that have resulted in a decrease in ED visits and hospitalizations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=30344481923&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=30344481923&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02770900500369835

DO - 10.1080/02770900500369835

M3 - Review article

VL - 42

SP - 807

EP - 812

JO - Journal of Asthma

JF - Journal of Asthma

SN - 0277-0903

IS - 10

ER -