Reducing mesh size for finite element modeling of transvenous defibrillation

Amy Curry, F. J. Claydon

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The objective of this study is to determine if transvenous defibrillation simulations can be simplified by reducing the size of the volume conductor model. The study is implemented with a physiologically realistic 3-D finite element model of the human thorax. The model computes potential distributions within the heart from a knowledge of defibrillation shock strength, defibrillation electrode location, and the relative conductivities of the interior thorax. Results are compared between a model of the entire torso and a model consisting only of the heart surrounded by a spherical shell. Comparison of the potential distributions within the heart between the two models yielded a root mean square error of 13.6% and a correlation coefficient of 0.995. For the finite element solution, storage requirements were decreased by a factor of 4 and computational time was reduced by a factor of 15. These results indicate that for transvenous defibrillation simulations the size of the model can be greatly reduced by excluding the interior structures of the torso external to the heart. In addition, the results suggests that interior structures such as the lungs may not affect the potential distributions within the heart during transvenous defibrillation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1302-1303
Number of pages2
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1996 18th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Part 4 (of 5) - Amsterdam, Neth
Duration: Oct 31 1996Nov 3 1996

Fingerprint

Torso
Thorax
Interiors (building)
Shock
Electrodes
Mean square error
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Reducing mesh size for finite element modeling of transvenous defibrillation. / Curry, Amy; Claydon, F. J.

In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, Vol. 3, 01.12.1996, p. 1302-1303.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

@article{b3cf539bad85405fb16e17cad9ef0e1b,
title = "Reducing mesh size for finite element modeling of transvenous defibrillation",
abstract = "The objective of this study is to determine if transvenous defibrillation simulations can be simplified by reducing the size of the volume conductor model. The study is implemented with a physiologically realistic 3-D finite element model of the human thorax. The model computes potential distributions within the heart from a knowledge of defibrillation shock strength, defibrillation electrode location, and the relative conductivities of the interior thorax. Results are compared between a model of the entire torso and a model consisting only of the heart surrounded by a spherical shell. Comparison of the potential distributions within the heart between the two models yielded a root mean square error of 13.6{\%} and a correlation coefficient of 0.995. For the finite element solution, storage requirements were decreased by a factor of 4 and computational time was reduced by a factor of 15. These results indicate that for transvenous defibrillation simulations the size of the model can be greatly reduced by excluding the interior structures of the torso external to the heart. In addition, the results suggests that interior structures such as the lungs may not affect the potential distributions within the heart during transvenous defibrillation.",
author = "Amy Curry and Claydon, {F. J.}",
year = "1996",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "1302--1303",
journal = "Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings",
issn = "1557-170X",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reducing mesh size for finite element modeling of transvenous defibrillation

AU - Curry, Amy

AU - Claydon, F. J.

PY - 1996/12/1

Y1 - 1996/12/1

N2 - The objective of this study is to determine if transvenous defibrillation simulations can be simplified by reducing the size of the volume conductor model. The study is implemented with a physiologically realistic 3-D finite element model of the human thorax. The model computes potential distributions within the heart from a knowledge of defibrillation shock strength, defibrillation electrode location, and the relative conductivities of the interior thorax. Results are compared between a model of the entire torso and a model consisting only of the heart surrounded by a spherical shell. Comparison of the potential distributions within the heart between the two models yielded a root mean square error of 13.6% and a correlation coefficient of 0.995. For the finite element solution, storage requirements were decreased by a factor of 4 and computational time was reduced by a factor of 15. These results indicate that for transvenous defibrillation simulations the size of the model can be greatly reduced by excluding the interior structures of the torso external to the heart. In addition, the results suggests that interior structures such as the lungs may not affect the potential distributions within the heart during transvenous defibrillation.

AB - The objective of this study is to determine if transvenous defibrillation simulations can be simplified by reducing the size of the volume conductor model. The study is implemented with a physiologically realistic 3-D finite element model of the human thorax. The model computes potential distributions within the heart from a knowledge of defibrillation shock strength, defibrillation electrode location, and the relative conductivities of the interior thorax. Results are compared between a model of the entire torso and a model consisting only of the heart surrounded by a spherical shell. Comparison of the potential distributions within the heart between the two models yielded a root mean square error of 13.6% and a correlation coefficient of 0.995. For the finite element solution, storage requirements were decreased by a factor of 4 and computational time was reduced by a factor of 15. These results indicate that for transvenous defibrillation simulations the size of the model can be greatly reduced by excluding the interior structures of the torso external to the heart. In addition, the results suggests that interior structures such as the lungs may not affect the potential distributions within the heart during transvenous defibrillation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030312398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030312398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference article

AN - SCOPUS:0030312398

VL - 3

SP - 1302

EP - 1303

JO - Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings

JF - Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings

SN - 1557-170X

ER -