Reduction of patient anxiety in PET/CT imaging by improving communication between patient and technologist

Yong Bradley, Patrick Barlow, Dustin Osborne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients experience anxiety during imaging procedures because of the confined space, uncertainty about the procedure, worry about the results, and other concerns. When a patient experiences anxiety during PET/CT imaging, the quality of the scan can be affected in several ways. Current patient-technologist communication is limited in PET/CT because the technologist must be separated from the patient during the course of the imaging workflow. This study investigated the use of a call device enabling rapid communication to reduce patient anxiety. Methods: Clinical patients with various oncologic indications and undergoing 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging were asked to participate in anxiety surveys under several conditions. Metrics were tracked regarding the survey results for comparison between groups and survey conditions. During the course of this study, 2 patient surveys were used. One of the patient populations was asked to fill out a survey on personal perceptions of the use of such a device, with questions related to their comfort with the device and the degree to which they perceived the device to reduce their anxiety. The 2 remaining populations were given a standard Spielberger State Anxiety survey for anxiety assessments against control populations. Results: Perception survey results indicated that 75% of the respondents experienced a reduction in anxiety and that 84% would request this type of device for other procedures. A correlation was observed between improved patient-technologist communication and perceived feelings of safety, with identical percentages of positive responses. Although responses were mostly positive, 18.8% did not perceive any reduction in anxiety, and the same number indicated they would not use the system in the future. For those patients given the standard Spielberger State Anxiety survey, a statistically significant reduction in anxiety was observed (P < 0.05) in those patients given a call device. Reductions in anxiety were observed for all patient populations, including first-time and repeated-imaging patients. Conclusion: Patient anxiety can be reduced through the use of a tangible device that improves communication between the patient and the imaging staff. Reducing anxiety may have a positive effect on imaging, because involuntary motion may be reduced and there may be improvement in the patients' comfort and in their overall experience with the imaging procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-217
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Anxiety
Communication
Equipment and Supplies
Population
Confined Spaces
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workflow
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Uncertainty
Emotions
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Reduction of patient anxiety in PET/CT imaging by improving communication between patient and technologist. / Bradley, Yong; Barlow, Patrick; Osborne, Dustin.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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