Reduction of stuttering

The dual inhibition hypothesis

Tim Saltuklaroglu, V. N. Dayalu, J. Kalinowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Treatment for stuttering attempts to reduce or eliminate the observable core markers of the disorder, specifically repetitions and prolongation. In this hypothesis, it is proposed that stuttering may be inhibited by two distinct yet related procedures: active inhibition and passive inhibition. Active inhibition is brought about when the person who stutters makes volitional changes to his or her speaking pattern, such as when employing behavioral modification techniques. Passive inhibition automatically inhibits the involuntary stuttering block and can be induced from an external source, such as altered auditory feedback, or by the use of sufficient active inhibition. It is suggested that passively inhibiting stuttering results in speech that is more automatic, natural sounding, and truly fluent speech than the speech that is derived primarily from active inhibition. Evidence of passive inhibition resulting from active inhibition can be seen when people who stutter exhibit uncontrolled fluency following behavioral therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Stuttering
Inhibition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Reduction of stuttering : The dual inhibition hypothesis. / Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Dayalu, V. N.; Kalinowski, J.

In: Medical Hypotheses, Vol. 58, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 67-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saltuklaroglu, Tim ; Dayalu, V. N. ; Kalinowski, J. / Reduction of stuttering : The dual inhibition hypothesis. In: Medical Hypotheses. 2002 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 67-71.
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