Regenerative dentistry

translating advancements in basic science research to the dental practice.

Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Peter Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. This review provides an assessment of how tissue engineering, stem cell, genetic transfer, biomaterial and growth factor therapies can be integrated into clinical dental therapies to restore and regenerate oral tissues. In parallel to the creation of a new field in general medicine called "regenerative medicine," we call this field "regenerative dentistry." While the problems of introducing regenerative therapies are substantial, the potential benefits to patients and the profession are equally ground-breaking. In this review, we outline a few areas of interest for the future of oral and dental medicine in which advancements in basic science have already been adapted to fit the goals of 21st century dentistry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of the Tennessee Dental Association
Volume90
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Dental Research
Dentistry
Biocompatible Materials
Tissue Engineering
Tooth
Human Genome Project
Technology
Transfer Factor
Oral Medicine
Regenerative Medicine
Molecular Biology
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Stem Cells
Therapeutics
Cell Culture Techniques
Medicine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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