Regenerative therapies for retinopathy

Ramesh Periasamy, Raja Shekhar Gangaraju

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Studies conducted in animal models and human tissues have suggested that retinopathies occur through loss of cells resulting in vascular leakage, excessive immature retinal angiogenesis, and neuronal degeneration eventually leading to loss of vision. Regenerative therapy offers a great promise for such terminally differentiated organs with a stem cell-based therapy. A variety of stem cells including tissue specific endogenous stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and adult mesenchymal stem cells have been considered. Although we made great progress in regenerative therapies in the last two decades, much of the stem cell work on retinopathies came from animal models that do not mimic human retinopathies. In addition, the key molecular and cellular signaling mechanisms in these stem cells in relation to the hostile disease environment have not been thoroughly investigated. Last but not least, the unwanted, unintended differentiated cell types from stem cells likely affect the function, efficacy, and safety of a stem cell product and therefore long-term studies relevant to human conditions must be addressed. As we attempt to translate these cell therapies from preclinical studies into the clinic, challenges remain to be solved center on reproducible manufacturing ability and testing in clinically validated end points relevant to human retinopathies. This chapter describes the current aspects of stem cell therapy in retinopathy, specifically for Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinopathy of Prematurity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRegenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient
Subtitle of host publication4. Regenerative Therapies I: Third Edition
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages205-227
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9783319282930
ISBN (Print)9783319282916
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2016

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Stem cells
Animals
Tissue
Cell signaling
Endothelial cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Periasamy, R., & Gangaraju, R. S. (2016). Regenerative therapies for retinopathy. In Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient: 4. Regenerative Therapies I: Third Edition (pp. 205-227). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28293-0_9

Regenerative therapies for retinopathy. / Periasamy, Ramesh; Gangaraju, Raja Shekhar.

Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient: 4. Regenerative Therapies I: Third Edition. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 205-227.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Periasamy, R & Gangaraju, RS 2016, Regenerative therapies for retinopathy. in Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient: 4. Regenerative Therapies I: Third Edition. Springer International Publishing, pp. 205-227. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28293-0_9
Periasamy R, Gangaraju RS. Regenerative therapies for retinopathy. In Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient: 4. Regenerative Therapies I: Third Edition. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 205-227 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28293-0_9
Periasamy, Ramesh ; Gangaraju, Raja Shekhar. / Regenerative therapies for retinopathy. Regenerative Medicine - from Protocol to Patient: 4. Regenerative Therapies I: Third Edition. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 205-227
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