Regional and global shape and size of the intact myocardium

J. S. Janicki, Karl Weber, S. Shroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An understanding of cardiac mechanics and function in both the normal and the diseased heart requires a knowledge of the three-dimensional configuration of the myocardium and its ventricular chambers. Cardiac shape and size may be described using dimensional, volume, or surface descriptors. To date, most studies have been confined to the first two methods. However, with recent advances in computer technology, a three-dimensional surface description of the myocardium is now feasible. To obtain an epicardial and endocardial surface representation, sectional measurements have to be obtained and the data converted to digital form. Accordingly, border recognition, section thickness, and the choice of a reference axis for sectioning are factors that will determine the accuracy of such an analysis. Border recognition is a function of image quality and represents the limiting factor to spatial resolution in the plane of measurement. The sensitivity of a surface representation to section thickness will depend on the degree to which shape varies from section to section. Variations in regional myocardial shape are sufficiently gradual so that acceptable approximations of the apex to base circumference, cross-sectional area relations, and overall volumes can be obtained using 5 mm sections. The centers of gravity for the myocardial and left and right ventricular sectional profiles rigorously define a set of reference axes around which myocardial and left and right ventricular chamber mass are balanced. Thus with the present technology a detailed three-dimensional analysis of regional and global shape and size of the myocardium and its ventricular chambers is now possible. This information also provides a foundation for obtaining a surface representation of the heart using noninvasive methods of measurement, such as two-dimensional echocardiography and X-ray scanning tomography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2017-2022
Number of pages6
JournalFederation Proceedings
Volume40
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Myocardium
X Ray Tomography
Technology
Gravitation
Mechanics
Echocardiography
Heart Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Regional and global shape and size of the intact myocardium. / Janicki, J. S.; Weber, Karl; Shroff, S.

In: Federation Proceedings, Vol. 40, No. 7, 1981, p. 2017-2022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Janicki, JS, Weber, K & Shroff, S 1981, 'Regional and global shape and size of the intact myocardium', Federation Proceedings, vol. 40, no. 7, pp. 2017-2022.
Janicki, J. S. ; Weber, Karl ; Shroff, S. / Regional and global shape and size of the intact myocardium. In: Federation Proceedings. 1981 ; Vol. 40, No. 7. pp. 2017-2022.
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