Regional Vulnerability of the Developing Brain to Alcohol Exposure

J. R. West, D. J. Bonthius, Kristin Hamre, D. R. Pierce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: These experiments were designed to look at regional vulnerability of the brain as a function of the daily dose and pattern of alcohol administration. Rat pups were given alcohol, using an artificial rearing technique, during postnatal days 4–10, a time period of brain growth which corresponds to that which occurs in humans during the third trimester. Alcohol was administered in 2 different paradigms: either continuously (with feedings every 3 hours) or condensed (with alcohol in 4 of 12 daily feedings). Regional weights, areal measurements or cell counts were recorded. With the condensed paradigm, a daily dose of 4.5 g/kg significantly lowered total brain weight and cerebellar weight, but a higher dose (6.6 g/kg) was needed to decrease brainstem weight significantly. Areal measurements revealed that continuous exposure to 9.8 g/kg/day reduced the hippocampus 26% and the cerebellum 15%, while the dentate gyrus was not affected. Following condensed exposure (6.6 g/kg/day), the cerebellum was reduced 23%, while the hippocampus and dentate gyrus were not significantly affected. Cell count data produced similar results. There was regional vulnerability with different brain regions and different neuronal populations within a single region unequally affected as a function of both daily alcohol dose and pattern of administration. 1988 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-68
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Drug and Alcohol Review
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

brain
vulnerability
alcohol
Alcohols
Brain
Weights and Measures
Dentate Gyrus
Cerebellum
Hippocampus
Cell Count
paradigm
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Brain Stem
drug
experiment
Growth
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Regional Vulnerability of the Developing Brain to Alcohol Exposure. / West, J. R.; Bonthius, D. J.; Hamre, Kristin; Pierce, D. R.

In: Australian Drug and Alcohol Review, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.1988, p. 65-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

West, J. R. ; Bonthius, D. J. ; Hamre, Kristin ; Pierce, D. R. / Regional Vulnerability of the Developing Brain to Alcohol Exposure. In: Australian Drug and Alcohol Review. 1988 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 65-68.
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