Regulation and possible significance of leptin in humans

Leptin in health and disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interest in the regulation of body weight and the pathophysiology of obesity has been rekindled by the cloning of the obese (ob) gene and identification of its product, leptin. Leptin's impressive metabolic effects in mice (inhibition of food intake, stimulation of energy expenditure, reversal of obesity, and amelioration of insulin resistance), though most desirable, are yet to be demonstrated in humans. However, numerous studies in humans indicate that leptin is a regulated hormone that may be involved in diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes. The physiological factors that modulate plasma leptin levels include sex, body fat, exercise, and fluctuations in caloric supply. Plasma leptin levels exhibit a peripubertal surge and a postmenopausal decline, and they are responsive to hormonal manipulations. Hormones that increase leptin production include insulin, glucocorticoids, estradiol, and growth hormone; those that decrease leptin levels include testosterone, somatostatin, and insulin-like growth factor I. End-stage renal disease, a catabolic and anorectic state, is associated with marked elevation in plasma leptin levels. These and other data documenting the presence of leptin in placenta, cord blood, and breast milk and alterations in certain disease states are reviewed in this review focusing on leptin measurement in humans. Understanding the role and regulation of leptin in health and disease is a prerequisite to a rational utilization of leptin-based regimens in the treatment of disorders of human metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-38
Number of pages16
JournalDiabetes Reviews
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leptin
Health
Obesity
Hormones
Physiological Phenomena
Appetite Depressants
Human Milk
Somatostatin
Fetal Blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Placenta
Energy Metabolism
Glucocorticoids
Growth Hormone
Chronic Kidney Failure
Insulin Resistance
Testosterone
Adipose Tissue
Organism Cloning
Estradiol

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Regulation and possible significance of leptin in humans : Leptin in health and disease. / Dagogo-Jack, Samuel.

In: Diabetes Reviews, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1999, p. 23-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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