Relapse revisited.

J. L. Vaden, Edward Harris, R. L. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rather little is known about the changes in orthodontic treatment results exceeding a decade after treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in tooth relationships in a series of cases (n = 36) at 6 years and again at 15 years after treatment. The rate of change decreased with time, supporting the contention that most "relapse" occurs soon after treatment; continued change generally cannot be distinguished from normal aging processes that occur, regardless of whether a person had been treated orthodontically. There were minor, but statistically significant, associations between increased incisor irregularity ("relapse") and parasagittal growth of the jaws. Greater irregularity occurred when mandibular growth exceeded that of the maxilla, decreasing overjet and crowding the lower incisors within the containing arch of the maxilla. Overall, relapse tended to be less in these cases treated by a single experienced specialist that in university-based samples treated by multiple, orthodontic residents.

Fingerprint

Maxilla
Incisor
Orthodontics
Recurrence
Growth
Jaw
Tooth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

@article{8aefb4174b414e5db37f51aff322a696,
title = "Relapse revisited.",
abstract = "Rather little is known about the changes in orthodontic treatment results exceeding a decade after treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in tooth relationships in a series of cases (n = 36) at 6 years and again at 15 years after treatment. The rate of change decreased with time, supporting the contention that most {"}relapse{"} occurs soon after treatment; continued change generally cannot be distinguished from normal aging processes that occur, regardless of whether a person had been treated orthodontically. There were minor, but statistically significant, associations between increased incisor irregularity ({"}relapse{"}) and parasagittal growth of the jaws. Greater irregularity occurred when mandibular growth exceeded that of the maxilla, decreasing overjet and crowding the lower incisors within the containing arch of the maxilla. Overall, relapse tended to be less in these cases treated by a single experienced specialist that in university-based samples treated by multiple, orthodontic residents.",
author = "Vaden, {J. L.} and Edward Harris and Gardner, {R. L.}",
year = "1997",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0889-5406(97)70291-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "111",
pages = "543--553",
journal = "American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics",
issn = "0889-5406",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relapse revisited.

AU - Vaden, J. L.

AU - Harris, Edward

AU - Gardner, R. L.

PY - 1997/1/1

Y1 - 1997/1/1

N2 - Rather little is known about the changes in orthodontic treatment results exceeding a decade after treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in tooth relationships in a series of cases (n = 36) at 6 years and again at 15 years after treatment. The rate of change decreased with time, supporting the contention that most "relapse" occurs soon after treatment; continued change generally cannot be distinguished from normal aging processes that occur, regardless of whether a person had been treated orthodontically. There were minor, but statistically significant, associations between increased incisor irregularity ("relapse") and parasagittal growth of the jaws. Greater irregularity occurred when mandibular growth exceeded that of the maxilla, decreasing overjet and crowding the lower incisors within the containing arch of the maxilla. Overall, relapse tended to be less in these cases treated by a single experienced specialist that in university-based samples treated by multiple, orthodontic residents.

AB - Rather little is known about the changes in orthodontic treatment results exceeding a decade after treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in tooth relationships in a series of cases (n = 36) at 6 years and again at 15 years after treatment. The rate of change decreased with time, supporting the contention that most "relapse" occurs soon after treatment; continued change generally cannot be distinguished from normal aging processes that occur, regardless of whether a person had been treated orthodontically. There were minor, but statistically significant, associations between increased incisor irregularity ("relapse") and parasagittal growth of the jaws. Greater irregularity occurred when mandibular growth exceeded that of the maxilla, decreasing overjet and crowding the lower incisors within the containing arch of the maxilla. Overall, relapse tended to be less in these cases treated by a single experienced specialist that in university-based samples treated by multiple, orthodontic residents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031132867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031132867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0889-5406(97)70291-9

DO - 10.1016/S0889-5406(97)70291-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 9155814

AN - SCOPUS:0031132867

VL - 111

SP - 543

EP - 553

JO - American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

JF - American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

SN - 0889-5406

IS - 5

ER -