Relapse revisited - Again

Kenneth C. Dyer, James L. Vaden, Edward Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Long-term changes in the dentitions of orthodontic patients have been studied. However, most studies in the literature report findings after only a few years posttreatment. In this study, we examined records an average of 24 years after active treatment. The purpose was to answer 2 questions: (1) does irregularity increase with time after treatment, and (2) how much relapse can be expected if a conservatively treated sample is recalled 2.5 decades after active treatment? Methods: The sample consisted of dental casts of 52 women who were treated in the mid-1970s to the early 1980s with 0.022 × 0.028-in standard edgewise appliances. Each was given a maxillary Hawley retainer and either a mandibular Hawley or a banded canine-to-canine retainer at debanding. Retention lasted 24 to 32 months. The same practitioner treated all the patients. The sample is one of convenience; specifically, inclusion depended only on each patient's willingness to return for a recall examination. Records were collected at 3 examinations for each patient: start of treatment, end of the active phase of treatment, and long-term retention recall. The long-term maxillary and mandibular casts were measured and occluded in maximum intercuspation. Variables were measured, including incisor overjet and overbite, buccal segment relationship of the first molars and canines, and incisor irregularity in each arch. Variables were measured on the casts with digital readout sliding calipers precise to 0.001 mm. Results: Mandibular incisor irregularity at recall was less than 3.5 mm in 77% of the patients examined. Correction of the maxillary incisor irregularity remained relatively stable over the time interval studied. Buccal segment Class II correction remained stable at the recall examination. Conclusions: Orthodontic treatment can yield reasonably good long-term stability in both occlusal correction and tooth alignment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume142
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

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Incisor
Recurrence
Canidae
Cheek
Orthodontics
Tooth
Therapeutics
Overbite
Dentition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Relapse revisited - Again. / Dyer, Kenneth C.; Vaden, James L.; Harris, Edward.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 142, No. 2, 01.08.2012, p. 221-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dyer, Kenneth C. ; Vaden, James L. ; Harris, Edward. / Relapse revisited - Again. In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. 2012 ; Vol. 142, No. 2. pp. 221-227.
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