Relating plaque morphology to respiratory syncytial virus subgroup, viral load, and disease severity in children

Young In Kim Hoehamer, Ryan Murphy, Sirshendu Majumdar, Lisa G. Harrison, Jody Aitken, John Devincenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Viral culture plaque morphology in human cell lines are markers for growth capability and cytopathic effect, and have been used to assess viral fitness and select preattenuation candidates for live viral vaccines. We classified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) plaque morphology and analyzed the relationship between plaque morphology as compared to subgroup, viral load and clinical severity of infection in infants and children.Methods:We obtained respiratory secretions from 149 RSV-infected children. Plaque morphology and viral load was assessed within the first culture passage in HEp-2 cells. Viral load was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as was RSV subgroup. Disease severity was determined by hospitalization, length of stay, intensive care requirement, and respiratory failure.Results:Plaque morphology varied between individual subjects; however, similar results were observed among viruses collected from upper and lower respiratory tracts of the same subject. Significant differences in plaque morphology were observed between RSV subgroups. No correlations were found among plaque morphology and viral load. Plaque morphology did not correlate with disease severity.Conclusion:Plaque morphology measures parameters that are viral-specific and independent of the human host. Morphologies vary between patients and are related to RSV subgroup. In HEp-2 cells, RSV plaque morphology appears unrelated to disease severity in RSV-infected children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-388
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Research
Volume78
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Virus Diseases
Viral Load
Viral Vaccines
Critical Care
Respiratory Insufficiency
Respiratory System
Length of Stay
Hospitalization
Viruses
Cell Line
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Growth
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Relating plaque morphology to respiratory syncytial virus subgroup, viral load, and disease severity in children. / Kim Hoehamer, Young In; Murphy, Ryan; Majumdar, Sirshendu; Harrison, Lisa G.; Aitken, Jody; Devincenzo, John.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 78, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 380-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim Hoehamer, Young In ; Murphy, Ryan ; Majumdar, Sirshendu ; Harrison, Lisa G. ; Aitken, Jody ; Devincenzo, John. / Relating plaque morphology to respiratory syncytial virus subgroup, viral load, and disease severity in children. In: Pediatric Research. 2015 ; Vol. 78, No. 4. pp. 380-388.
@article{a2a0790627da481bb0c4cae847cf1a1e,
title = "Relating plaque morphology to respiratory syncytial virus subgroup, viral load, and disease severity in children",
abstract = "Background:Viral culture plaque morphology in human cell lines are markers for growth capability and cytopathic effect, and have been used to assess viral fitness and select preattenuation candidates for live viral vaccines. We classified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) plaque morphology and analyzed the relationship between plaque morphology as compared to subgroup, viral load and clinical severity of infection in infants and children.Methods:We obtained respiratory secretions from 149 RSV-infected children. Plaque morphology and viral load was assessed within the first culture passage in HEp-2 cells. Viral load was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as was RSV subgroup. Disease severity was determined by hospitalization, length of stay, intensive care requirement, and respiratory failure.Results:Plaque morphology varied between individual subjects; however, similar results were observed among viruses collected from upper and lower respiratory tracts of the same subject. Significant differences in plaque morphology were observed between RSV subgroups. No correlations were found among plaque morphology and viral load. Plaque morphology did not correlate with disease severity.Conclusion:Plaque morphology measures parameters that are viral-specific and independent of the human host. Morphologies vary between patients and are related to RSV subgroup. In HEp-2 cells, RSV plaque morphology appears unrelated to disease severity in RSV-infected children.",
author = "{Kim Hoehamer}, {Young In} and Ryan Murphy and Sirshendu Majumdar and Harrison, {Lisa G.} and Jody Aitken and John Devincenzo",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/pr.2015.122",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "78",
pages = "380--388",
journal = "Pediatric Research",
issn = "0031-3998",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relating plaque morphology to respiratory syncytial virus subgroup, viral load, and disease severity in children

AU - Kim Hoehamer, Young In

AU - Murphy, Ryan

AU - Majumdar, Sirshendu

AU - Harrison, Lisa G.

AU - Aitken, Jody

AU - Devincenzo, John

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Background:Viral culture plaque morphology in human cell lines are markers for growth capability and cytopathic effect, and have been used to assess viral fitness and select preattenuation candidates for live viral vaccines. We classified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) plaque morphology and analyzed the relationship between plaque morphology as compared to subgroup, viral load and clinical severity of infection in infants and children.Methods:We obtained respiratory secretions from 149 RSV-infected children. Plaque morphology and viral load was assessed within the first culture passage in HEp-2 cells. Viral load was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as was RSV subgroup. Disease severity was determined by hospitalization, length of stay, intensive care requirement, and respiratory failure.Results:Plaque morphology varied between individual subjects; however, similar results were observed among viruses collected from upper and lower respiratory tracts of the same subject. Significant differences in plaque morphology were observed between RSV subgroups. No correlations were found among plaque morphology and viral load. Plaque morphology did not correlate with disease severity.Conclusion:Plaque morphology measures parameters that are viral-specific and independent of the human host. Morphologies vary between patients and are related to RSV subgroup. In HEp-2 cells, RSV plaque morphology appears unrelated to disease severity in RSV-infected children.

AB - Background:Viral culture plaque morphology in human cell lines are markers for growth capability and cytopathic effect, and have been used to assess viral fitness and select preattenuation candidates for live viral vaccines. We classified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) plaque morphology and analyzed the relationship between plaque morphology as compared to subgroup, viral load and clinical severity of infection in infants and children.Methods:We obtained respiratory secretions from 149 RSV-infected children. Plaque morphology and viral load was assessed within the first culture passage in HEp-2 cells. Viral load was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as was RSV subgroup. Disease severity was determined by hospitalization, length of stay, intensive care requirement, and respiratory failure.Results:Plaque morphology varied between individual subjects; however, similar results were observed among viruses collected from upper and lower respiratory tracts of the same subject. Significant differences in plaque morphology were observed between RSV subgroups. No correlations were found among plaque morphology and viral load. Plaque morphology did not correlate with disease severity.Conclusion:Plaque morphology measures parameters that are viral-specific and independent of the human host. Morphologies vary between patients and are related to RSV subgroup. In HEp-2 cells, RSV plaque morphology appears unrelated to disease severity in RSV-infected children.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942876601&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942876601&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/pr.2015.122

DO - 10.1038/pr.2015.122

M3 - Article

C2 - 26107392

AN - SCOPUS:84942876601

VL - 78

SP - 380

EP - 388

JO - Pediatric Research

JF - Pediatric Research

SN - 0031-3998

IS - 4

ER -