Relationship between patterns of alcohol use and negative alcohol-related outcomes among U.S. Air Force recruits

Jennifer E. Taylor, C. Keith Haddock, W. S.Carlos Poston, Gerald Talcott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The negative impact of alcohol use on workplace performance is of significant concern to the U.S. military, given the costs associated with recruiting, hiring, and training personnel. However, little is known about the extent of potential alcohol use problems of recruits. We examined the history of alcohol-related problems among recruits entering the Air Force (N = 37,858). Although the average age of recruits was <21 years, 78% reported consuming alcohol and 49% reported binging before basic military training. Recruits who drank reported having negative alcohol-related outcomes (NAROs). In fact, >95% reported that they or someone else had been injured as a result of their drinking and that a relative, friend, doctor, or other health care worker has been concerned about their drinking. The remaining NAROs were reported by approximately one-quarter of those who drank. However, recruits who reported binge drinking were substantially more likely to report more NAROs, such as morning drinking, inability to stop drinking, having others be concerned about their drinking, having blackouts, fighting, having injured or been injured, feeling guilty about their drinking, and wanting to reduce the amount they drink. Results suggest that alcohol-related problems are common among recruits before basic military training and screening for future problems may be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-382
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume172
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Drinking
Air
Alcohols
Binge Drinking
Workplace
Emotions
History
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Relationship between patterns of alcohol use and negative alcohol-related outcomes among U.S. Air Force recruits. / Taylor, Jennifer E.; Haddock, C. Keith; Poston, W. S.Carlos; Talcott, Gerald.

In: Military medicine, Vol. 172, No. 4, 01.01.2007, p. 379-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, Jennifer E. ; Haddock, C. Keith ; Poston, W. S.Carlos ; Talcott, Gerald. / Relationship between patterns of alcohol use and negative alcohol-related outcomes among U.S. Air Force recruits. In: Military medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 172, No. 4. pp. 379-382.
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