Relationship between smokeless tobacco use and body weight in young adult military recruits

Mark W. Vander Weg, Robert C. Klesges, Margaret DeBon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-time cigarette smokers tend to weigh less than nonsmokers, and those who quit smoking typically gain weight. Little is known, however, about the relationship between smokeless tobacco and body weight. The present study investigated the association between smokeless tobacco use and body weight among 22,974 Air Force recruits (27.4% female, mean age=20.2 years, body mass index=22.7) undergoing basic military training. Current, former, and experimental smokeless tobacco users weighed significantly more than recruits who had never tried smokeless tobacco (p values <.05). Logistic regression analysis also indicated that the likelihood of being classified as overweight was significantly greater for daily (OR=1.29, 95% CI=1.07-1.54), occasional (OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.17-1.93), former (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.05-1.67), and experimental (OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.02-1.24) smokeless tobacco users relative to never-users (p values <.05). These results suggest that smokeless tobacco use does not have significant weight-attenuating effects, at least in the short term. Furthermore, using chewing tobacco or snuff may be associated with a greater body weight among young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-305
Number of pages5
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smokeless Tobacco
Tobacco Use
Young Adult
Body Weight
Tobacco Products
Weight Gain
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Smoking
Air
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Relationship between smokeless tobacco use and body weight in young adult military recruits. / Vander Weg, Mark W.; Klesges, Robert C.; DeBon, Margaret.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 7, No. 2, 04.2005, p. 301-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vander Weg, Mark W. ; Klesges, Robert C. ; DeBon, Margaret. / Relationship between smokeless tobacco use and body weight in young adult military recruits. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2005 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 301-305.
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